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-   -   'Can't Believe It's Not Butter' users? (http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=78823)

cam90066 04-18-2008 04:17 PM

'Can't Believe It's Not Butter' users?
 
A few months I purch'd a couple of the spray/spritz bottles in this product line. Had NO clue it would last as long as it has so I have over 1/2 of one bottle and the second still has its plastic seal. BUT, they're due to 'expire' w/in a few days. Called customer service for the maker and listened to their taped message about 'Best Used By' info. Of course, they're recommending it not be used after the BUB date (mostly for product quality).

Have you used this beyond the BUB date? If so, for how long? Am I better off tossing it? I use can sprays for cooking and have enlisted them LONG after their alleged 'Use by' date w/o a problem.

TIA,
cam

Silver 04-18-2008 05:02 PM

I would be surprised if that stuff actually goes bad. I would suspect it would survive a nuclear war, if not for the melting. (Just an in jest opinion, don't take it as fact.) ;)

Oils will go rancid after a while, but they'll just taste stale. Some start to taste really awful. I don't think they'll actually become harmful. If it tastes ok, I'd use it. I'm sure customer service is only following what their "book" says to say. They can't actually tell you "yes, you can eat it after the expiry date" even if you can.

Silver 04-18-2008 05:10 PM

Oh, and by the way, and I don't mean to sound preachy here, just trying to be helpful, ok? :)

Fake butters and margarines are actually worse for you than real butter because they are mostly chemicals and unknown substances to your body. Instead of using fake butter, this is what I do:

Soften a pound of butter and mix well with 2 cups of olive oil (an electric mixer is great for this job). Pour it into a container like one of those Glad or Ziplock plastic containers, and put it in the fridge. Let it set up overnight. The result is a SPREADABLE butter straight from the fridge that is 50% heart healthy olive oil. It tastes like butter, but is much, much better for you than either regular butter or margarines.

bailsmom 04-18-2008 05:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Silver (Post 1097542)
Oh, and by the way, and I don't mean to sound preachy here, just trying to be helpful, ok? :)

Fake butters and margarines are actually worse for you than real butter because they are mostly chemicals and unknown substances to your body. Instead of using fake butter, this is what I do:

Soften a pound of butter and mix well with 2 cups of olive oil (an electric mixer is great for this job). Pour it into a container like one of those Glad or Ziplock plastic containers, and put it in the fridge. Let it set up overnight. The result is a SPREADABLE butter straight from the fridge that is 50% heart healthy olive oil. It tastes like butter, but is much, much better for you than either regular butter or margarines.


Umm, doesn't olive oil have like 120 calories for 1 tablespoon? :shrug: I'm quoting from Biggest Loser, so I may be off a bit but that seems like a crap-load of calories. Healthy or not, watch your portions people! :thumbsup:

Cynamar 04-18-2008 05:29 PM

Another big thing is to eat tub butter and not stick butter. There are more hydrogentated fats in stick butter to make it keep shape. I only use real butter and olive or canola oil. I do use sticks for baking cookies but don't bake them very often. Olive oil has calories but the fat in it doesn't raise your cholesterol. I have read that canola actually helps to lower it. Moderation is huge, of course.

feministmama 04-18-2008 05:38 PM

I tried googling it but I couldn't find it. Isn't there a list of the "good" oils and the "bad" ones?

And they need a list of things to throw away after the due date. Like mayonnaise. if smells ok and taste ok then why not right? But will you get botulism or something? Some things are obvious like milk and moldy bread but what about relish? mustard? I mean unless there's mold on it (like tomato sauce) then I'll eat it. I hate throwing away food. I wish I had a pig or something to slop the food too.

And how does adding oil to butter make it healthier :??

Cynamar 04-18-2008 05:47 PM

Mostly I guess it dilutes it???

Jan in CA 04-18-2008 05:56 PM

We use it, but I don't know the answer to your question. :shrug:

I don't think using a small amount of this type of product isn't bad if you use it in moderation especially when you are dieting. I only use a few sprays on veggies.

Most stick butters have 100 calories per tablespoon and are full of saturated fat which isn't good for you either.
http://www.landolakes.com/products/V...roductID=15136

I found this, Lori.
http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/s...ad-fats?page=3

knitgal 04-18-2008 06:05 PM

I think someone else said the key is moderation and I agree.
I use margarine as a spread, but I like to use butter in cooking because I have read that when oil is heated it's molecules change and become unstable, whereas butter stays the same.
My Eat, Shrink and be Merry cookbook says this makes butter better for cooking.

Cynamar 04-18-2008 06:26 PM

I think it's more important to eat your veggies than to completely cut out the margarine. If you need the margarine to get them down then use a little but try to cut back some by adding spices for flavor.


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