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-   -   Deer Yarn? (http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=88611)

kellyh57 02-03-2009 02:17 PM

Deer Yarn?
 
I'm constantly seeing dead deer on the side of the road (and have a few hunting friends.) Is there such a thing as deer yarn? Just curious. I can just see me out there skinning the deer on the side of the road if I find it's a great yarn source! :roflhard: You hear of all kinds of other animals being turned into lovely yarn. Why not deer?

Kelly

leaette 02-03-2009 03:43 PM

never heard of deer yarn

HollyP 02-03-2009 03:49 PM

I would think, but I may be wrong, that deer hair is too short to be spun into yarn. It seems that the animals whose fur/hair is made into yarn have longer hairs. My neighbor growing up spun her golden retriever's fur into lovely yarn.

cftwo 02-03-2009 03:51 PM

I agree with Holly. I don't think I've ever pet a deer, but their fur looks a lot like the coats of horses (minus the manes, of course), and I don't see how you could easily spin that. There's just not much to twist together.

GinnyG 02-03-2009 03:56 PM

:passedout: :passedout: :passedout: :passedout:

Lisa R. 02-03-2009 04:51 PM

I'm not a spinner, but I'd have to agree...wouldn't it be way too short to spin??

Mike 02-03-2009 05:03 PM

Probably not.
Deer hair is course and tubular.
There is an extremely fine under fur but the hair is too course to allow it to comb out and there isn't much of it. It is kind of kinky if there was an easy way to get it separated I bet it would hold together even though it is short.

The hair is also very hard on clippers so shearing probably isn't a good option.

loveswildflowers 02-04-2009 09:13 AM

what I learned in science class
 
I used to teach science and I had a really cool set of materials on mammals. We did a comparison of some common North American mammals including deer. We examined fur samples up close and what I remembered is that deer have a lot of guard hairs (not good for soft yarn).

Out of curiosity and to make sure I had remembered correctly, I did a little research for those of you who are into animal trivia and found the following info from a booklet posted at the University of Georgia's School of Forest Resources.

It confirmed that in the summer deer have ALL guard hairs in their coats. In the winter they have a different fur composition that includes soft underfur, but it still sounds like there is a lot of guard hair.

I'm not a spinner, but there is the scientific angle for what it's worth!


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