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Old 06-09-2011, 12:01 PM   #1
Shandeh
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Location: Charlotte, NC
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Fullsize Oddball Blankets - The ones that started it all!
For the past few years, I've been knitting a row at a time on our 5 large (bed-size) Oddball Blankets. Our forum started knitting them in February of 2007, and the blankets each travelled all over the United States to be knitted one section at a time.

When all the blankets completed their travels, they ended up in my little home in North Carolina. Funny thing is, they all arrived at pretty much the same time.

I've committed myself to completing the blankets, so they can be donated to charity. This involves a lot:

Knitting more sections to make them all large enough.
Repairing any damage the blankets got during their travels.
Adding a border, if necessary.
Weaving in all the loose ends.
Gently washing and drying them.
Mailing or giving them to charity.

This has been a very slow process for me, because of my arthritis. These blankets are HUGE! Each row on the blankets has 300 stitches. I've had to add about 20 sections of knitting to the blankets. This is a LOT of stitching, and a lot of yarn too! Thankfully, I've received lots of gifted yarn from friends for the blankets. I haven't had to buy a single skein.

Repairing the blankets has been a monumental task. First of all, I lay each blanket on the floor, and crawl across, looking for damage. A couple times, I've had to cut across an entire blanket, and rip out a section to re-knit it, then put it back in with Kitchener Stitch. Amy Finlay (the creator of our Knitting Help website) helped me figure out how to do that.

In comparison, simple holes are easy to repair. I just get yarn of a similar color, and stitch it closed with a yarn needle.

If a blanket needs a border to make the edges look nicer, I grab my crochet hook and a coordinating yarn, and get to work. Sure is a lot of crocheting, since the blankets are so big!

There sure are a lot of ends to weave in! Whew! Some people left a very long piece of yarn attached, so I have to cut it to a shorter length, then carefully weave in the yarn, so it will not come loose again in the wash.

My washer and dryer both have a gentle cycle, so I'm using that to clean them. I will have to be extra careful with the all-wool blanket, using all cold water settings, and the "fluff" setting in the dryer. It will probably take 4 hours to dry that one.

When all the blankets are finally finished and clean, I will be ready to give them to charity. The all-wool blanket will be going to the Wool-Aid charity, to be given to the appropriate place. I'm sure they will find a perfect home for it.

One of our blankets (Oddball Blanket #5) has already been given to the Yurok tribe, through the Knit for Hope group.


The rest of the blankets will be given to Habitat for Humanity, if they need them. If they don't, I will send them to Project Linus. The blankets will be perfect for teens.

I'm finally starting to see a light at the end of the tunnel now, because I'm knitting the last section on Oddball Blanket #1! Woo Hoo! It looks great, and does not need a border, so I'll be able to give it a good wash next week. I think I'll take it to Habitat for Humanity, along with the journal, so they can see the work that went into creating it. Photos to come soon!
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