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Old 03-12-2008, 10:48 AM   #11
campbellmom549
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If she's just dying to get far away, take a look at Mississippi State Univertsity. They are well known for both their undergrad and grad programs for medicine. And it's in Starkville, which is a little town in the middle of nowhere. Hard to go clubbing when there's no clubs.
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Old 03-12-2008, 02:44 PM   #12
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If your daughter is looking for a smaller supportive school look at http://www.collegesthatchangelives.com - you'll see a LOT of good schools there in all areas of the country. I attended one of them (Wooster - I was almost 17 when I enrolled) and know and respect a number of others (Juniata or Allegheny for sciences, Kalamazoo for study abroad, Hope or Wheaton for more conservative values, Marlboro is more liberal, etc.). These are places which will take care of the students, while still letting them grow up. Note: These are NOT the place for a student who wants a big-school experience. You won't find it at any of these schools.

I work in higher education research, and spend a lot of time looking at other schools. Feel free to PM me with specific questions and I'll see what I can dig up. I can find just about anything. In my opinion, one of the key indicators of a GOOD school where students are happy with the education and the services is the Retention Rate, which is shown on most statistics-based resources. Anything over 85% is really good (keep in mind, some students flunk out). And listen to what everyone said about the campus visit - you can really get a feel for a campus through a visit/interview.
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Old 03-12-2008, 03:10 PM   #13
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Really good advice so far, I just wanted to add that a school in the middle of nowhere might be actually more conducive to partying. Because the kids have nowhere to go or nothing to do at night, many will probably stay on campus drinking and partying. Take PennState. Talk about being in the middle of nowhere. The university is basically the town (aptly named State College). And yet, they don't call it Happy Valley for nothing.

(Of course, there are probably exceptions to this rule that I haven't heard of.)
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Old 03-12-2008, 03:56 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by cftwo View Post
If your daughter is looking for a smaller supportive school look at http://www.collegesthatchangelives.com - you'll see a LOT of good schools there in all areas of the country. I attended one of them
Hey my school is on that list too, neat! I'm familiar with lots of the others too and they're great.
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Old 03-13-2008, 09:35 AM   #15
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I work at West Chester University in PA. It's a state school. Very good pre-med program.

We're also in the new Kiplinger Report as a "Best Buy" school.

Tuition is reasonable, there isn't a huge party scene, and West Chester is a cool little town , close enough to Philly Airport in case she needs to get home quickly.
(Or, when Mom and Dad need a "kid fix" and want to come visit)
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Old 03-13-2008, 11:38 AM   #16
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Just my two cents, but I don't think choosing based upon whether or not it's a "party school" is the best criteria. Cost vs academic reputation, available programs and resources, and how well the school fills her needs based upon her future goals are far better ways to decide upon a school.

As already mentioned, she can do her first couple of years at just about any school and spend that time evaluating med schools. I think a well rounded school that fits in your financial and logistics abilities would fit her needs just fine.

Also keep in mind that in state tuitions are far less expensive than out of state. If you can buy just as good a widget for half the money why buy the more expensive one?
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Old 03-13-2008, 11:40 AM   #17
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You will have to watch out for what the school's math and science teachers are like. Your daughter will need a first class premed program, not just the credits but also the knowledge. I learned more from the small colleges I went to in general terms, but I did notice they had some clunkers in the math and science departments.
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Old 03-16-2008, 10:44 AM   #18
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This has been my experience and observation. There is good and bad at every college. Even the most strict religious institutes have their problems. I could tell you stories about the Christian College in my town that are absolutely shocking! I live in a college town. We have a junior college, 2 Christian colleges, and a state university. What I have observed is that people make choices. And those choices are based both on how they were raised, what they saw of their parents and how they percieve themselves. Many kids who go off to college are tasting freedom for the first time. Some can handle that freedom and make mature decisions. Others make poor decisions. There are drinkers and partiers at every college. It all depends on who you decide to make friends with.

You might find the best college with the lowest alcohol/drug incident rate and your daughter will still find the 1% that party or you may decide on a college that has lots to offer and your daughter will associate herself with people who are working hard to make good grades and gain something from their college experience other than a good party. If you have given your daughter some independence, taught her the values that are important to you and have good communication with your daughter you can only hope that she will make informed decisions as she faces the life before her.
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Old 03-17-2008, 11:58 AM   #19
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In so far as applying to medical school, where you go undergrad does matter. My older son went to the University of Penn. About 90% of the pre meds there got into medical school. He got into all but two he applied to. The daughter of a friend of ours had exactly the same GPA with a slightly worse score on the MCAT. She went to a well rated state school in New York and got rejected by all of her choices but one and was wait listed at that one. If she is serious about med school keep that in mind.

My younger son goes to Washington University in St.Louis and I cannot say enough good things about the place. They are wonderful to deal with and are generous in giving financial aid. The campus is set at the edge of Forrest Park which is bigger than Central Park in New York and has more to offer. The setting, although its in St. Louis, is suburban. They are very service oriented. One example is the fact that every single day they have a dean on call. Any student at all can walk into that office without an appointment and present their problem. My son has had his problems there but they have stuck with him 100% of the way.
Their medical school is almost always either number 1 or 2 in the country.

I would highly recommend looking at competitve schools in the midwest. Because schools prize geographical diversity, she will get into a much better school than if she stuck with the east coast schools.

I would also take a very close look at Canadian colleges. Even for for foreign students, the tuition rate is dramatically lower than American colleges. Macleans Magazine ranks colleges the same way that US News and World Report does.

Finally, I would go along with all those who recommend going to the colleges themselves. Some colleges which look good on paper just send off the wrong vibe in person. The colleges look on it as a positive in terms of admission if you've actually made the effort to come before applying.
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