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Old 01-07-2013, 02:12 PM   #31
knitcindy
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I started out knitting in the English style, but now use Continental. Here's the method I use for purling:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e6XBTxJfggU

It took me a loooong while to get the hang of this and don't really remember where I learned this particular method from, but I do remember being so happy to have finally gotten the hang of it!!

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Old 01-07-2013, 02:37 PM   #32
Antares
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Originally Posted by knitcindy View Post
I started out knitting in the English style, but now use Continental. Here's the method I use for purling:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e6XBTxJfggU

It took me a loooong while to get the hang of this and don't really remember where I learned this particular method from, but I do remember being so happy to have finally gotten the hang of it!!

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This is how I currently purl. My left index finger goes up and down all the time; however, it creates a lot of hand fatigue, which is why I want to try the method illustrated in the German short row video.
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Old 01-07-2013, 03:45 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Antares View Post
This is how I currently purl. My left index finger goes up and down all the time; however, it creates a lot of hand fatigue, which is why I want to try the method illustrated in the German short row video.
I purl pretty much the same as in the knitpurlhunter video, but I sort of rock my left hand toward me and there is generally less movement with my index finger. I doubt that makes much sense but it's the only way I can describe it. Which German short row video are you referring to?
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Old 01-07-2013, 04:17 PM   #34
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The German short row link is in the 13th post on this thread. She uses her right index finger to pull the yarn down and through so she doesn't have to move her left index finger that's holding the yarn. I want to try it when I get back to trying continental knitting. I also want to try that norwegian purl.
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:36 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by Lizars1735 View Post
I also want to try that norwegian purl.
This method really shines when you are working ribbing or seed stitch and you no longer have to switch the yarn from back to front as you move from knit to purl. Then miles of moss stitch become fun! happydance:
You can always use it just for the ribbing of sweaters and then use the regular method for stockinette. I know I already mentioned this, but I just love talking about how much this method has helped my hands and wrists!
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Old 01-08-2013, 03:30 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by Rie View Post
This method really shines when you are working ribbing or seed stitch and you no longer have to switch the yarn from back to front as you move from knit to purl. Then miles of moss stitch become fun! happydance:
You can always use it just for the ribbing of sweaters and then use the regular method for stockinette. I know I already mentioned this, but I just love talking about how much this method has helped my hands and wrists!
Rie, I just tried the Norwegian purl and I love it!! It's so great to purl with the yarn behind. I did a practice ribbing and it was great. My stitches are totally loose and I need a lot of practice (for all I know, I'm supposed to knit that loose), but it will definitely go along way with my continental knitting practice. Since I just learned continental, doing the Norwegian purl doesn't feel awkward, it feels good. I just have to watch out for accidental yarn overs.....
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Old 01-09-2013, 03:50 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by Lizars1735 View Post
Rie, I just tried the Norwegian purl and I love it!! It's so great to purl with the yarn behind. I did a practice ribbing and it was great. My stitches are totally loose and I need a lot of practice (for all I know, I'm supposed to knit that loose), but it will definitely go along way with my continental knitting practice. Since I just learned continental, doing the Norwegian purl doesn't feel awkward, it feels good. I just have to watch out for accidental yarn overs.....
That's great to hear! I think I hit a new knitting level when I learned this method because I can knit for hours now without fatigue.
Your stitches will tighten up over time and those yarn overs will disappear as well. You might want to try a project like a basic ribbed scarf or the GAP-tastic cowl in an inexpensive frog-forgiving yarn and you will have that muscle memory by the end of it guaranteed.
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Old 01-10-2013, 12:01 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by Lizars1735 View Post
I just have to watch out for accidental yarn overs.....
Hi again! I just remembered this video from Beth Brown-Reinsel where she addresses a common cause of mistaken yarn overs when using the Norwegian Purl method. The mistake section starts around the 2:00 mark.
It's from this thread of the NP Ravelry group which has several nice videos. Hope this helps.
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Old 01-10-2013, 01:57 AM   #39
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It does help. Thanks for the links. I joined the Ravelry NP group
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