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Old 01-09-2013, 12:47 AM   #21
dudeKnit
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Yes it is. I'm very familiar with metric, 90% of things dealing with rc planes is metric, the kicker is dealing with grams instead of ounces and pounds.

How does a yarns recommended needle size really mean, and why is there a suggested size? Does it have to do with diameter of the yarn?
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:05 AM   #22
GrumpyGramma
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A yarn's recommended needle size is related to the diameter of the yarn. Fingering or sock weight yarn will call for about a 2 or 3 needle. Worsted weight will call for about an 8 or 9. The skinnier the yarn, the smaller the recommended needle size. It gives you an idea of the gauge to expect, but..... YMMV.

My advance in understanding metrics in relation to yarn amounts: A 50 gr. ball of yarn makes 1 sock, a 100 gr. ball makes a pair.
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Old 01-09-2013, 08:05 AM   #23
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Well last night on my 7th row I decided it was too wide, so I started over. This time I really took my time casting on and tried to make the cast on stitches as uniform as possible as well as attempted to maintain uniform spacing and tension. I got 2 rows done so far and this is the best looking attempt yet.

On the previous attempt I believe I picked up stitches, how does that happen? I started with 75 stitches, this time I went with 67, but where do extra stitches materialize from? Is it really necessary to count stitches in each row?

I will also be picking up larger needles both in bamboo as well as the connected circular kind. I'm ready to experiment and see which style I like best.
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Old 01-09-2013, 08:44 AM   #24
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The needle size on the yarn ball is a recommendation for that yarn weight. You may knit more tightly or more loosely and so need to change the needle size in order to get the gauge or stitches per inch that you want or that a pattern calls for.
Yes, those pesky extra stitches. See if you can tell where the extra stitch occurs along the current or previous rows. Sometimes it's a yarn over that happens when you change from knits to purls or vice versa. Instead of bringing the yarn between the two needles as you should, the yarn is brought over the right needle and that creates an extra stitch. The other common place for extra sts is at the beginning of a row. If you pull the yarn up from the left needle, the single stitch at the needle tip looks like two sts. Knitting into both legs will give you an increase. Pull the yarn down and to the side or back so that you can see that there's only one stitch there.
Using markers can help with counting sts (and locating extra sts). These can be as simple as a loop of yarn with a knot. Put them on the needle every 10 or 20sts to make counting easier. Counting sts is a very good practice for checking your work and finding mistakes early on.
You're learning a lot with each row. Good luck with it!
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Old 01-09-2013, 10:33 AM   #25
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The needle size on the yarn label is actually more for putting a yarn into a weight class (fingering, worsted, bulky), rather than a 'recommended' size. Patterns will use a smaller or larger needle for a design effect - a smaller one gives a tighter denser knit, something you want with socks, while a larger one will give a looser, more open knit, such as for scarves or shawls. But in general the gauge and needle size is relative to the thickness of the yarn.

It's very easy with garter stitch to pick up new stitches at the beginning of rows. If the yarn is over the top of the needle to the back it can pull up the first stitch and each leg of it looks like a separate stitch. When you start, hold the yarn off to the side a little so you can see the first stitch easier.
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:32 PM   #26
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I found this handy-dandy needle conversion chart at http://www.yarnfwd.com/main/needleconv.html

Depending on where you live, you could find it helpful when talking on our forum or others - most of the people are in the U.S., and talk about 2's & 3's, 8's & 9's etc. I'm Canadian and we use metric, so - totally different. You'd think I'd get used to it and remember on my own...apparently not, lol.
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Old 01-09-2013, 03:33 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by GrumpyGramma View Post
I've wondered if people who work with computers have one up on the rest of us when it comes to reading and following knitting patterns, after all you're used to things that must be specific down to minute details. But maybe you don't work with code. I've thought my SIL would be really good at knitting if he wanted to but then....now that I think of it....some patterns are written so they'd make his blood boil. Maybe he shouldn't be knitting. LOL However, I should probably say that he is almost certainly undiagnosed Asperger's. I can picture him now rewriting all the patterns...nope he better stick with his 'puters.
As a programmer (and a dude), there are things about knitting patterns that irritate me but I imagine they're the same things that irritate anyone, regardless of profession. Usually the things that get under my skin are things that don't make sense. Some of those are things that just don't make sense to me, others are things that don't make much sense in general.

Probably there's a correlation if you look at the success that IT types have with knitting, but not necessarily a cause-and-effect relationship. My girlfriend has a master's in computer science and she's probably THE most brilliant knitter I know. She does things that ... well, you'd just have to watch her. Then you have me, who's worked in the field for 22 years and... well, let's just say I haven't achieved anything close to "brilliance" as a knitter yet. Yet.

I suspect that the connection isn't direct, but probably two different manifestations of the same underlying aptitude. Musicians (good ones at least) are usually good at mathematics. They'd probably make good knitters too (or programmers for that matter) if they took up the craft.
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Old 01-09-2013, 03:45 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by dudeKnit View Post
Well last night on my 7th row I decided it was too wide, so I started over. This time I really took my time casting on and tried to make the cast on stitches as uniform as possible as well as attempted to maintain uniform spacing and tension. I got 2 rows done so far and this is the best looking attempt yet.

On the previous attempt I believe I picked up stitches, how does that happen? I started with 75 stitches, this time I went with 67, but where do extra stitches materialize from? Is it really necessary to count stitches in each row?

I will also be picking up larger needles both in bamboo as well as the connected circular kind. I'm ready to experiment and see which style I like best.
Suzeeq is right about the "accidental YO's", I've been bit by that bug more than I can tell you. And that may very well be what's happening to you, but it wouldn't be when you're transitioning from knit to purl 'cos ... you're not doing that if you're working in garter stitch. But something that still happens to me once in a while is I'll get a loop from the previous row hung on the left hand needle, which looks for all the world like another stitch and the next thing you know... it IS another stitch 'cause I just knitted it. Or, you put the work down for a few minutes and when you pick it back up the working yarn has wrapped around the needle and... same thing happens. Or as you're wrapping the yarn for a stitch you accidentally wrap it "doubled up" and ... one stitch becomes two on the next row. (In that particular case you should be able to see two loops coming out of the same stitch when you get back around to it.)

So... no, you don't have to count the stitches in every row, but if you're seeing a lot of this you might want to deploy stitch markers every x stitches and check when you get to the end of a section. It's a lot quicker to count 10 (or 20 or whatever) sts since the last marker than it is to count 60 sts since the beginning of the row.
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Old 01-09-2013, 04:58 PM   #29
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As a coder you'll probably appreciate this, it's much easier to spot a fencepost error in code vs spotting the fencepost stitch.
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Old 01-09-2013, 06:00 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by dudeKnit View Post
As a coder you'll probably appreciate this, it's much easier to spot a fencepost error in code vs spotting the fencepost stitch.
Mmm... yeah, but when I'm coding I have QA to spot those errors. Heh.
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