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Old 05-06-2013, 01:52 PM   #11
Jan in CA
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Originally Posted by N0obKnitter View Post
I knit German style and I am Canadian and American.
What is German style? The terms German and American are so rarely used I can't keep them straight.

I'm a former crocheter, but I prefer to knit English style with my working yarn in my right hand. I can knit continental as well and use both styles for fair isle.
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Old 05-06-2013, 02:42 PM   #12
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Maybe Tunisian is the bi-stitchual's hybrid?
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Old 05-06-2013, 02:45 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Jan in CA View Post
What is German style? The terms German and American are so rarely used I can't keep them straight.

I'm a former crocheter, but I prefer to knit English style with my working yarn in my right hand. I can knit continental as well and use both styles for fair isle.
German = Continental. The term Continental Is kind of a PC term/euphemism that started during world war 2...I think.
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Old 05-06-2013, 02:49 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Jan in CA View Post
What is German style? The terms German and American are so rarely used I can't keep them straight.

I'm a former crocheter, but I prefer to knit English style with my working yarn in my right hand. I can knit continental as well and use both styles for fair isle.

German = Continental. I read it was known as German knitting but fell out of favor around the time of WWII and was resurrected with a new name. Something like that. A rose by any other name ... I believe American = English, go figger. It's called that in at least some of knit freedom's videos, I've come across it other places too.
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Old 05-06-2013, 03:17 PM   #15
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Thanks, I'll try to keep it straight.
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Old 05-06-2013, 03:24 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by N0obKnitter View Post
German = Continental. The term Continental Is kind of a PC term/euphemism that started during world war 2...I think.
Great minds...
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Old 05-06-2013, 06:22 PM   #17
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I tried for several YEARS to learn knitting. My girlfriend, who held herself out to me as "a knitter," kept insisting that I learn the Long-Tailed Cast On. I didn't know any better; I thought it was the only cast on. (The one day of my life I was able to spend alone with my grandmother who knew how to knit, she also had shown me this cast-on; I couldn't learn it that day, either.)

I remembered from Grandma how to do the knit and purl stitches. (She had cast on for me and then shown me how to do the stitches themselves, which I remembered forever. But who's going to cast on for you? And, of course, we never did get to cast off....)

So, when I was at a community-service group in April 2011 and saw one of the knitters doing something weird with yarn and a needle, I watched from behind for a moment. I said, "Are you...casting on?" "Sure," she said, "anything that gets loops on the needle works just fine."

It was probably like the lightning that struck Saul of Tarses. I had her show me what she was doing--Backwards Loop, it was--and by the time of the May meeting, had learned how to knit.

I will do anything in my power to avoid using the Long-Tailed Cast-On for a project. I've learned several others by now and find the LTCO a PITA (PITB?), so Backwards Loop, Knitted-On, German Twisted (= Old Norwegian), Cable, and a couple of others will have to do for now.

D*mned thing cost me decades of knitting time.
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Old 05-06-2013, 06:26 PM   #18
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I love thumb cast-on (as I call it) for bridging gusset type holes. :-D

When I was attending knitting guild I dabbled in several cast on methods. I've since reverted back to long-tail for casting on. It's my fave.
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Old 05-06-2013, 06:30 PM   #19
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DCM...German cast on is just as difficult as LT if not more. But, once you get the hang of it they can both be fast and give a nice edge. Unlike backwards loop. I would never teach that to anyone.
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Old 05-06-2013, 06:46 PM   #20
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Wow! - look what happened while I was asleep!
:-)
What a fascinating thread this is: I thank you all.
Back to the beginning: yes, I use the yarn wrapped around the fingers of my right hand, so it's definitely English. Hardly surprising: when I was growing up, everything Australian was English, basically. I don't recall the point at which we suddenly did a quantum leap and abandoned that with which we'd been raised, and became Yankophiles, copying everything you guys do.
Particularly interested in DogCatMom's abhorrence of long-tail CO. One of the reasons it took me so long to get going on my monstrous beautiful project is that I kept trying it, and kept NOT achieving a sensible length of wool to be woven in, eventually, as the end. "About a foot for every 20 stitches", the video says: b*llsh*t. (See how thoughtful I am of others' sensibilities?) I tried a foot and a half, a foot and a quarter, a foot and three-quarters, two feet ... made no diff.: I NEVER ended up with a leftover end of a practical length. Which is why I said a couple of nasty things about it and returned to my normal style of CO.
I doubt I wind the wool correctly around my fingers, for using anything with a metallic thread is impossible, as it twists beyond belief. But, as with the spastic way I crochet, I've decided I'm far too old to change, and it works, anyway.
:-)
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