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Old 09-05-2010, 07:33 AM   #1
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Gauge?
I've gotten brave and am attempting a baby sweater for my grandson. I want to get started today; however it is for Berrocco Touche' and I plan to use Berrocco Comfort. They are both worsted and I don't think it will matter, but the Touche' says the gauge is 4.75 and the Comfort says its 4.5. What adjustments do I need to make and is it even possible?
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Old 09-05-2010, 09:40 AM   #2
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That's the gauge for the yarn and it's more to classify them into weight ranges, and these are close enough. You need to match the gauge in the pattern, so start with the same needle and see how that works; you may need to go up a size.
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Old 09-05-2010, 12:45 PM   #3
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Would it be acceptable to swatch it out, find the difference between the number of stitches per inch in mine and their's and then add additional stitches to mine to compensate? Does that make sense at all?
I'm also having a problem with my purl row--I seem to be adding a stitch on the purl rows--at least the first one. Any idea what I might be doing wrong?
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Old 09-05-2010, 01:17 PM   #4
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I don't really think you'll have any trouble matching the gauge and it's way easier to switch needle sizes than try to add more stitches. Otherwise your shaping might be off. Unless there's a larger size of the pattern, then you can use that.

When you begin the purl row, make sure your yarn is in front, not in back; if it's in the back then you're probably bringing it over the needle to purl the st. Move the yarn a bit out to the side edge, then bring to the front.
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Old 09-05-2010, 02:24 PM   #5
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I'm sorry Suzeeq, but I'm totally lost on gauge. The yarn it calls for has a 20 gauge for 4" and the one I'm using has a 18 gauge for 4". Since I'm totally new to knitting anything besides a blankie, can you please walk me through what to do step by step.

You're totally right about the extra stitch on purl--I figured out while I was stitching that I had my yarn in the back to begin the row which gave me an extra stitch.
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Old 09-05-2010, 02:31 PM   #6
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What does the pattern say for gauge? That's what you want to go by, not the gauge on the yarn label. All the label gauge indicates is that one is slightly thinner than the other, but the difference isn't enough to adjust your stitches. Cast on about 24 sts with the Comfort on the needle used in the pattern, and knit about 3", then do a couple rows of garter and use the next size larger needle for about 3". Measure both sets of sts to see which one is closer to the pattern's gauge and use that needle.
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Old 09-06-2010, 03:34 AM   #7
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MOST patterns give the gauge in a section above the actual pattern. it may be short: "20st27r" or something like this... (meaning 20 stitches, 27 rows) ... but you mostly find something.

if not: there mostly is a sketch for the parts of the finished piece. look for a section in plain stochinette or garter in that pullover and find out how many stitches that section has. Then you know the stitches and inches for that section. You can do the math then.

But really: Mostly the pattern has that specific information for you.

Is your pattern available online? if so: let us see the link and we can be of more help!

changing the needle size has the result of changing the stitch size.

a bigger needle makes a bigger stitch. So if you do a swatch and have the wrong number of stitches in it, go up or down needle sizes until you get approximately right. (more stitches into the 4 inch? use a smaller needle. less stitches into the 4 inch? use a bigger needle).

but really: with baby cloth: it is not ALL that important to be dead on with your measures.

what size does the baby wear? what sizes does your pattern give you?

I tend to use yarn on baby outfits that is just SOMEwhere in the general range and then make a pattern several "nominal" sizes to big or small for the little one by the stitch and row instructions (making sure that I take the measures in inches or cm of the size I really want). And babies DO grow pretty fast - so rather overshoot by a little then remain too small.
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Old 09-06-2010, 06:51 AM   #8
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My problem is that the pattern was "written" by the owner of my LYS and it's very vague. It says a gauge of 4.75 per inch and I'm using a slightly thinner yarn that it calls for. This is for my grandson and I want to be sure it's big enough. I'm a beginning knitter and I've never made a garment, so I'm a little stressed about it anyway. I'm currently knitting a swatch as suggested by Suzeeq and we'll see where I turn up after that. I'll probably need help interpreting my swatch. I'm assuming my LYN wrote the pattern because I haven't been able to find the pattern on the internet--it's called Touche' Boys Jacket for 1 year (2 years). It's just a little hooded jacket with ribbing around the bottom and I want to add a couple of rows of contrasting color yarn down the front and across the bottom, plus stripe the sleeves so it looks like and "athletic" sweater. We're Alabama fans, so I'm doing it in red and white. I'll have to change the pattern to do the striping so if you know of a pattern that looks like that, PLEASE let me know. Can you tell I'm way in over my head?
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Old 09-06-2010, 08:44 AM   #9
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hi!
if the pattern says that gauge: fine, that is your reference point.

make your swatch. count it out. tell us the result. If you differ from the instructions, let us know how many stitches you have in e.g. the front piece. then we can tell you, by how much your garment will be off and if it needs to be fixed or is fine.

don't stress that much. Things look way more scary in the fog than bright light. Just keep asking and we keep telling.

you want stripes in your hoodie. Good choice, I like it. Team look: great.

but you do not have to change the pattern for making them.
I assume your pattern will tell you how many rows of knitting you need for the front, the back and the sleeves (and the hood) or (more likely) it will tell you for how many inches you will keep going with something.

Well, you just go ahead and substitute one yarn for the other at the beginning of a row. (typically one uses a right side row to start a new color, but that only matters if you do garter stitch). then you work that row, work back in that yarn and: there you go: a stripe of 2 rows tall is done.
If that is all you want: change back to your original color.

If you do a taller stripe, twist the original color yarn and the stripe color yarn once around one another before you work row 3. then you do not have a trailing thread at the side (it is called "cabling up" sometimes).

the same thing you do, if there are more stripes in the other color and they are not soooo far appart (lets say about 6-8 row max). then you cable up the stripe color and use it again when it is time. for longer stretches: cut your yarn, leaving a tail to weave in and start over once it is time for a stripe.

you make your life incredibly more easy if your stripes or the main color always start in a right side row. (meaning they come in even numbers of rows wide). then all your yarn changes happen on the same side of the piece and you do not get confused.

the stripes you can just ignore, though, in the counting of rows or measuring of inches for your pattern. it will still be the same length.

I assume you chose the same type yarn for both colors? then the size will be identical anyways.

if you do stuff like those stripes, pay close attention to the "brand name garment" about where to place the stripes and how to combine them. The eye is very used to that and recognizes differences quickly. the big brands have it figured out well.

I could imagine to do the cast on and 2 rows along each piece in the stripe color (in the ribbing then) to give a professional touch.

also little accessories sometimes really make it. Can you get a sew-on-tag somewhere? A small thing with the team logo? partially a key chain attachment, earring or the like... if you mount that (sew on) somewhere on the piece, that gives a very professional touch. I like that with garments because it takes all prejudice to the right side: "Great piece!" comes first, then "where from". If you don't add anything like that, fine anyways, of course.
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Old 09-06-2010, 09:44 AM   #10
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Then you want to try for a gauge of 4.75 sts per inch, which is 19 sts over 4" and a lot easier to figure out than that .75 st. So yes, tell us what happens when you get the sample knit with both needles and we can go from there.

Don't freak out, remember everything is knit one stitch and one row at a time, so even the most complicated seeming project can be simplified. We're here to help you out.
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