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Old 02-03-2011, 05:13 PM   #11
Jmstorm
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Laura Ingalls Wilder is a favorite of mine! Interesting thing about the books, they are published as fiction because they wouldn't believe she could remember things as vividly as she did. It is interesting to think about how they knitted and the tools they used. I agree, she was probably very good at it!
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Old 02-03-2011, 05:29 PM   #12
MGM
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Tradition says that the cloth the Jesus wore on his way to his crucifixion was made all in one piece and was such a beautiful piece of work that the guards cast lots to see who would get it instead of dividing it up. I've seen artwork showing Mary knitting in the round with lots of double pointed needles making clothing for Jesus. Don't know how accurate that is, but I would guess that double pointed needles and knitting in the round have been around for a very long time!

Love love love LIW and all things Little House on the Prairie! Everyone should read those books!

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Old 02-03-2011, 11:42 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by MGM View Post
Tradition says that the cloth the Jesus wore on his way to his crucifixion was made all in one piece and was such a beautiful piece of work that the guards cast lots to see who would get it instead of dividing it up. I've seen artwork showing Mary knitting in the round with lots of double pointed needles making clothing for Jesus. Don't know how accurate that is, but I would guess that double pointed needles and knitting in the round have been around for a very long time!

Love love love LIW and all things Little House on the Prairie! Everyone should read those books!

MGM
Wow really? That is neat, the idea that Mary (Jesus' mother) even knit in the round!
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Old 02-07-2011, 08:53 PM   #14
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"I wonder if Laura or her mother, or if women in general back then got carpel tunnel/arthritis from all the handi-work things they did (knitting/crocheting/sewing/embroidery, etc..) I know after even a few hours of knitting my wrists start hurting!"

Of course the women back then got all kinds of joint injuries. Remember, they had no running water, electricity or heat. They hauled water and firewood, for heat and cooking, every day from childhood on. Handiwork was a rest for them.

There wasn't much old age arthritis, rheumatism, and such because most didn't live past 40. Divorce wasn't prevalent either . . . for the same reasons.

LIW was, of course, born mid 19th century and lived till the mid 20th. Those before her going back to the early pioneers didn't survive that long.

I don't know about all of you, but I may have been a real wuss in those days.
Jean
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Old 02-08-2011, 03:23 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Woodi View Post
Gee, I had never heard of her until just now. Sorry, no patterns, but I Googled her and she seems to have lived a very interesting (and difficult) life. I will look for stories about her now....her life makes mine seem like a piece of cake!

and just when I was feeling a bit sorry for myself, having to face shovelling all this snow....my front entrance this morning:


Your home is beautiful... love the snow and the building very much!
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Old 02-08-2011, 09:23 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by TEMA View Post
Your home is beautiful... love the snow and the building very much!
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TEMA's right. Beautiful. Good for you!
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Old 02-08-2011, 10:24 PM   #17
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I would think anyone back then with enough money could get a master woodcrafter to make any size and shape knitting needles for them. As for metal ones, that would be difficult pre-industrial revolution. Possible but difficult, for sure. Maybe iron... cast iron. I haven't done a lot of reading on this yet, so don't quote me on it.

Actually, thinking of making metal needles is reminding me of the coat hooks I made just before Christmas. Really, to make something like that, they would either have to heat up and draw the metal through a round hole in another object that's harder than the toughness of the heated metal or they'd have to heat it and hit it with a hammer, turn, hit, etc. until it was the correct shape and thickness. If they used the second way of doing this, the created item would end up lumpy or square... even if just a little bit so.
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Old 02-09-2011, 12:37 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by wellslipmystitches View Post
I don't know about all of you, but I may have been a real wuss in those days.
Jean
Laura came from strong pioneer stock. Not me. We must also consider their food was organic. No hormones or chemicals in their meat. They had that wonderful clean air when she was growing up. They were more physically active than we are. Their lives weren't carefree, but they didn't have the stresses we have with our new, improved modern lives. When I think how the era she grew up in was in so many ways better than ours, I just wish they could have had our health care.

I'm an in-home caregiver for a 94 year old, born & raised in the country. She grew up harder, but still better for it. No wuss in her.

I've read nonfiction books about LIW. Interesting.
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Old 02-09-2011, 04:47 PM   #19
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If you haven't read LIW's books, you should. Even as an adult, they make a great read on these cold dreary winter days. My sisters and I wore out 2 sets of the the LIW books and now I have my own. Maybe I need to dig them out as a cure against the Februaries.

For centuries people have knitted socks. I think they would have figured out a long time ago how to knit them in the round with DPNs (wood or metal, depending on what was available).

And I, for one, am very glad to live in times that include indoor plumbing.
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Old 02-09-2011, 06:48 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Gertie View Post
Laura came from strong pioneer stock. Not me. We must also consider their food was organic. No hormones or chemicals in their meat. They had that wonderful clean air when she was growing up. They were more physically active than we are. Their lives weren't carefree, but they didn't have the stresses we have with our new, improved modern lives. When I think how the era she grew up in was in so many ways better than ours, I just wish they could have had our health care.

I'm an in-home caregiver for a 94 year old, born & raised in the country. She grew up harder, but still better for it. No wuss in her.

I've read nonfiction books about LIW. Interesting.
I agree whole-heartedly here... especially about having certain aspects of medicines and health knowledge. I wouldn't say all of it, though... I know I'd tough it out and would fit well!
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