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Old 12-14-2012, 02:04 AM   #31
Jan in CA
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That is awesome and the best way to learn!! I wish more people did that.

I am a former crocheter and who pile I can knit both methods my go to method is English. I use both, with one yarn in each hand, for fair isle.

To change skeins or colors just start knitting and weave in the ends later. You can knit with both together, but I find that leaves a bulky area that I don't like.
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Old 12-14-2012, 06:41 AM   #32
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Oh, I like the idea of a kind of pracitice swatch (or pot holder) where you can just press on with it and not worry about perfection. It's a great idea to deliberately make mistakes, recognize them and then fix them. There are some helpful videos under the Free Videos tab, Tips for joining new yarn and for fixing mistakes if you haven't already come across them. Sounds like you're making excellant progress.
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Old 12-14-2012, 11:06 AM   #33
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Good for you! I think the best way for people to learn knitting is playing with the yarn. That way you can see what you can do with it, or how to undo it.
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Old 12-14-2012, 11:45 AM   #34
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Sounds like you have a great method established for learning the art. Especially the part about making mistakes on purpose, in a controlled environment so when they happen for-real you'll know what to do with them.

My approach was more the Kamikaze School of Knitting. I don't recommend it.
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Old 12-14-2012, 11:58 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by Jan in CA View Post
That is awesome and the best way to learn!! I wish more people did that.

I am a former crocheter and who pile I can knit both methods my go to method is English. I use both, with one yarn in each hand, for fair isle.

To change skeins or colors just start knitting and weave in the ends later. You can knit with both together, but I find that leaves a bulky area that I don't like.
I've had some success in changing balls by knitting one stitch with both strands then dropping the "old" one, knitting a half dozen stitches or so with the new one and then going back to the join and pulling out the "old" part of that stitch. (Unless, of course, it's going to wind up hidden in the selvedge, which is where I try to put it if I have a choice. ) I find that if I do it that way it helps me keep the tension consistent across the join. YMMV.
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Old 12-14-2012, 04:43 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by GrumpyGramma View Post
CB, I'm so glad you're a hardy soul and didn't scare away so easily. I hope that somewhere in all this chatter you've found something useful. I guess we failed to mention that almost everybody finds purling harder. You said you crochet and remember how to hold the yarn, does that mean you're holding it in your left hand and knitting Continental? Some people work both knits and purls better English style, I can't manage purling English and can barely do knits. I'm glad there are no knitting police. There are other styles of knitting, Portugese, Eastern European (maybe the same as Russian) and combined. If you're interested in checking any of them and can't find them, someone here can probably provide a link. You should, if you haven't already, join www.ravelry.com. It's free and you get access to tons of patterns and there is other useful stuff there as well. You'll want to learn to tink...that's knit spelled backwards and it's a way of taking stitches back to the left needle one at a time. It sounds like you're making great progress.

The Frog said, "Rip it! Rip it!" and I did.
I tried both English and Continental, but the English felt weirdly backwards when I was trying to wrap the yarn around the needles. It was just oddly awkward, if that makes sense. And that's odd, cause I am right handed and crochet right handed!?!?! I am a wrap around the pinky feeding kind of gal, so I kept that method (wrap the pinkie and feed over the index finger)!

Thanks for telling me about purling being more difficult. I thought I was just a goober cause I just couldn't figure it out. I dropped that sucker I don't know how many times trying to figure out how it should work. But once I slowed it down, it all made sense. This tinkering is really fun. I want to jump into a project faster than I thought I would!!

Yesterday I also took out an entire row and fed it back onto the needle....HARD! I got it, but MAN! Sounds like I need to figure out what 'tinking' is all about somewhere in my ugly potholder frenzy!!

However, I am happy to report my potholder currently has no holes, so I am proud!!
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Old 12-14-2012, 04:53 PM   #37
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Quote:
Yesterday I also took out an entire row and fed it back onto the needle....HARD! I got it, but MAN! Sounds like I need to figure out what 'tinking' is all about somewhere in my ugly potholder frenzy!!
Taking the sts out one by one is harder if there's more than one row. The trick to putting stitches back on the needle is to use a smaller one than you knit them on.

What I do is kind of a combination of the 2 methods which you're welcome to try -
I rip out the rows until I'm on the one above the row I want to redo, with my yarn at the end of the RS row (this is because I do a lot of lace and it's easier that way). Then I pull that last row out stitch by stitch while putting the needle through each stitch that pops out. I don't usually use a smaller needle for this, but a person could when they're new to it.
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Old 12-14-2012, 04:54 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by CharleneB View Post
Yesterday I also took out an entire row and fed it back onto the needle....HARD! I got it, but MAN! Sounds like I need to figure out what 'tinking' is all about somewhere in my ugly potholder frenzy!!

However, I am happy to report my potholder currently has no holes, so I am proud!!
I wouldn't suggest this for your potholder project since the purpose is learning how to fix things, but once you're working on a project, I read something a few days ago that I thought was brilliant. The woman who wrote the hint mentioned using a "lifeline" when she was doing lace patterns (because if you think getting a whole row of stockinette back on the needle is hard...). She wasn't real clear (to me) in the details, but the gist -- I think -- was that every 5th row or so she'd thread a contrasting piece of scrap yarn through the loops before she knit the row/round. That way if she had to rip out one or more rows she'd have a "firewall" to keep her from going too far. Wendy, my pro-level knitter girlfriend and Yoda, says she takes the work out down to one row BEFORE the problem row, then "tinks" the rest of the way.

For purposes of the potholder project, though, keep doin' what you're doin'!
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Old 12-14-2012, 05:12 PM   #39
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Quote:
I tried both English and Continental, but the English felt weirdly backwards when I was trying to wrap the yarn around the needles. It was just oddly awkward, if that makes sense.
Yes, I understand! I somehow feel like I'm working upside down and backwards at the same time...or something similarly disconcerting. I don't understand why, I just figure it's something to do with how my brain works or doesn't.


Quote:
Thanks for telling me about purling being more difficult.
Purling is no longer difficult for me but it did take a while to get the hang of it. Part of it is figuring out how to tension the yarn, when to keep it tighter and when to loosen up. Only experience and practice can teach you that. Purl stitches also tend to be looser than knits. In combined knitting, the purl stitch is wrapped backwards (I have to think of it as the yarn is under the needle or the needle is over the yarn before wrapping the yarn) which produces a tighter, twisted stitch. On the next row, to untwist it, knit into the back loop (the one on the far side of the needle).
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Old 12-14-2012, 05:13 PM   #40
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There's a video for putting in lifelines here, I think it's on the Tips page. It can be useful even a nonlacey project too.
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