Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-04-2013, 04:37 PM   #11
Rie
1st Leg of the Journey
 
Rie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 131
Thanks: 65
Thanked 23 Times in 21 Posts
The Norwegian Purling Option
I had to switch to Continental because I have something wrong with my right hand and could no longer maintain tension in English style. At first I knit the standard Continental way but I had trouble with purling and I hated ribbing and seed stitch because I was(as in English too I guess) always switching back to front and this exhausted my weakling hands and wrists.
I then found this Cat Bordhi video where she demonstrates how to tighten purl stitches for Continental knitters with tension problems. It's a great video, but the one that really helped me most is this one. This method is called Norwegian by most knitters I think and it even has its own Ravelry group.
I've found this method to be the best for me and you may want to try it. I still sometimes switch to regular Continental or Combined if I'm doing p3tog or some other tight stitch, but then I have to look up how to do it because I'm so used to Norwegian style now.
Ultimately, I think its faster even though it seems like more manipulation at first.
Whatever method you learn, I think it does take a few weeks of awkwardness because you had muscle memory built up with your old way and now you are a beginner again with your new way. When I first switched to Continental I was in the middle of a stranded mitten project and had to put it aside and knit garter stitch scarves and such for a bit. It was very distressing but it was temporary and now I love knitting again.
Rie is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Rie For This Useful Post:
DavidSydney63 (01-05-2013)

 

This advertising will not be shown to registered members. Join our free online community today!

Old 01-04-2013, 07:18 PM   #12
Fergablu2
Casting On
 
Fergablu2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 12
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Lizars1735 View Post
Hi. I'm in the process of trying to switch from English, throwing style, to the faster continental style with the yarn on my left finger. I can't seem to keep any tension in the yarn no matter how I wrap it around my fingers. I can do a straight knit, but not purl, or anything else complicated. As soon as I start to lose tension it all falls apart. Any advice?
I knit continental. I loop the yarn around my pinkie, over my ring finger, under my middle finger, and over my first finger, and I keep the tension very well. It will take practice. I learned to knit by throwing when I was a child, but, as an adult, I taught myself to crochet, where you hold the yarn in your left hand (since I'm right handed), so when I started to relearn knitting, I had to learn continental.
__________________
Autism mom since 2001.
Fergablu2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 07:30 PM   #13
Antares
Working the Gusset
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 1,884
Thanks: 236
Thanked 675 Times in 632 Posts
You might also get some tips by watching videos of people who knit continental style. People hold and manipulate the yarn differently even while using the same style, and one of their tricks might help you with tension.

For example, the woman in this video for German short rows (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6n561SMZXQ) uses her right index finger to hold the yarn on the needle to form the purl stitch.

I'm trying to adjust my purling to doing it this way because it looks like less finger fatigue than what I'm doing. And in the process of trying this out, I noticed that my purl stitches were tighter than normal--which means my tension was tighter.
Antares is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Antares For This Useful Post:
Rie (01-04-2013)
Old 01-04-2013, 09:30 PM   #14
Rie
1st Leg of the Journey
 
Rie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 131
Thanks: 65
Thanked 23 Times in 21 Posts
Antares, that's a great video! That is also just about how I do purls when I have a tight spot.
Rie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 09:52 PM   #15
Lizars1735
1st Leg of the Journey
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 135
Thanks: 24
Thanked 66 Times in 52 Posts
Yes, that is an interesting video. I am definitely going to try that method of purling. I am also going to try the Norwegian purl as well. I'm just in the middle of a rush project. I tried to switch to continental in the middle, but the stitches were too loose. Not a good idea. I make my switch when this is done!

Thanks everyone for the great videos and advice!
Lizars1735 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 10:18 PM   #16
Antares
Working the Gusset
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 1,884
Thanks: 236
Thanked 675 Times in 632 Posts
And if all else fails, wash and slightly dry your hands every few minutes. The dampness makes your tension tighter but, of course, will probably also chap your hands. So be sure to slather on the lotion at the end of your knitting session.

On the bright side, you can count your trips to the sink as exercise! In fact, add ankle weights and tote your fully-loaded knitting bag back and forth each trip! And that, my friends, is how you combine knitting and exercise!
Antares is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2013, 12:10 AM   #17
Lizars1735
1st Leg of the Journey
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 135
Thanks: 24
Thanked 66 Times in 52 Posts
Antares, too funny!!
I could always knit with a finger bowl handy. Of course, I live in the desert and have perpetually dry hands already.....
Lizars1735 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2013, 06:42 AM   #18
DavidSydney63
Knitting the Flap
 
DavidSydney63's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
Posts: 454
Thanks: 300
Thanked 119 Times in 90 Posts
Fascinating thread, this.

What style of knitting is most common in North America?

In Australia - we (mainly) use the English style, though I have my own modified version as I find the purl stitch problematic. (the knit, fine).
DavidSydney63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2013, 10:52 AM   #19
suzeeq
Knit On!
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Montana
Posts: 27,765
Thanks: 160
Thanked 6,450 Times in 6,035 Posts
Send a message via Yahoo to suzeeq
In N America, English and continental are most common, though I think I've seen english more often. There are also a lot of knitters who use some form of eastern euro/russian style, some who do Portuguese and some use a combination of eastern/continental.
__________________
sue- knitting heretic

suzeeq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2013, 03:28 PM   #20
Lizars1735
1st Leg of the Journey
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 135
Thanks: 24
Thanked 66 Times in 52 Posts
I find it interesting that you've seen more english here in N America. I do a lot of looking things up on YouTube and have noticed more continental. Although, I admit that I don't see a lot of people knitting in general. I think that English is easier for right handed beginners to learn. It is how I learned.
Lizars1735 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Continental vs English Style knitting CognizantAmiga General Knitting 19 07-13-2011 11:52 AM
Knitting on DPN's (continental style) mrs.slavinsky General Knitting 1 02-12-2009 08:18 AM
question re. continental knitting style hally17 How-to Questions 6 10-27-2006 09:26 PM
continental vs. English style knitting mtlyga How-to Questions 3 08-10-2006 03:05 AM
Continental aka German style of knitting Phyllis How-to Questions 15 06-15-2005 11:09 PM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:42 PM.