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Old 01-14-2013, 12:45 PM   #51
mojo11
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Originally Posted by dudeKnit View Post
I love my new needles. Though they hurt if you slip and impale yourself.
Don't worry. Before you know it, you'll develop calluses that will armor plate your fingers and defend against such things.
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Old 01-14-2013, 01:19 PM   #52
fatoldladyinpjs
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You've got to give yourself a little slack here. You just started knitting. You can't expect to be perfect right out of the starting gate. It takes practice. I'd say work on the scarf and enjoy it. Get the mechanics down first. Practice so that the movements become natural for you.

What color is your scarf? Dark colors are harder to work with, even with the best lighting. I try not to knit with dark colors at night, only in daytime hours.

As to the correct needle size and yarn...this is way simplified. If you use larger needles and thinner yarn, your work will be thin and holey. If you're making a hat or mittens, it won't keep you warm. If you use a needle that's too small for the yarn, like you are now with the worsted weight, it's a pain to do. You'll be squeezing that needle into the stitches and straining to do it. It's not fun.

Another thing is that it's going to take forever. We knitters want instant results. Large needles somehow help us to get the creation fix we need faster. It's not a big deal with a scarf because gauge isn't important. I usually don't do patterns. I'll measure, gauge, pick the right needles and yarn, and design my own pattern. But I've been doing that for a while now. I saw this pattern that I am in love with and had to do. Almost finished with it now. But I'm using a sport weight yarn and needles that are in the 4 mm range that you're doing now. It's so putzy that I want to scream. But the project will be worth it when it's done. Here's the pattern. You guys might like this. It's a fitted watch cap. This is a vintage WW2 Red Cross pattern. Ignore the number 5 needle size listed here. They must have done sizing differently then. It's a 4 mm which is like our #6. The link is within this article.

http://handmadebymother.blogspot.com...ong-knits.html
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Old 01-14-2013, 01:56 PM   #53
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I saw that and did like the watch cap.

I upped my needles, at first I was trying to use a #4 (3 or 3.5mm) for full worsted weight. I moved up my needle size to a #7 and it's much much smoother.

Can't tell you how many times I've restarted this project after only 4 or 5 rows, Saturday once I got the larger stainless needles though they just felt right. The stitching is not quite as small as I want it but I can live with it. Other than the one hole the other imperfections in it so far are minor and I can live with them. It is starting to feel more natural and I've been moving away from my comfort zone of how I'm holding the needles and have been experimenting with different needle positions. My crutch now seems to be holding them in a T formation with the right needle vertical. For some reason it feels comfortable I've been trying to force myself to hold them parallel to each other when I notice I'm going back to old habits.

I have noticed a stark improvement though in both precision and speed as no doubt my muscles are starting to develop that movement memory and it's almost automagic I do still have to pay attention. Last night I think I did 4 rows or 56 stitches in under 20 minutes which is a personal best for me.

So far the only thing that is upsetting me is that I didn't take this hobby up sooner. It's going to be nice to finish it and I'm already looking ahead to my next project which I would like to do a sweater or possibly fingerless gloves for out flying.
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:17 PM   #54
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Originally Posted by dudeKnit View Post
So far the only thing that is upsetting me is that I didn't take this hobby up sooner. It's going to be nice to finish it and I'm already looking ahead to my next project which I would like to do a sweater or possibly fingerless gloves for out flying.
Welcome to the dark side... your conversion is nearly complete (bwahahahhhh).

As a second project, I'd suggest aiming slightly lower than a sweater. And the reason I say this is that my first sweater is STILL on the needles and has already undergone a couple of major design changes. That was my third (apparel) project after a scarf and a basic ski cap. I figured I had done one flat and one round, so I got the basics... right?

:ahem:

Sweaters, even basic ones, can be tricky... plus they involve a LOT of stitches, and shaping. I understand the ambition TOTALLY. But as one who has been there done that pretty recently, I'd suggest doing some smaller things first to get introduced to the techniques you'll need before you find yourself chest deep in a Brain-Eating Zombie Sweater.

But if you DO decide to dive into the deep end, you might want to keep some smaller projects on the fire to give you a break from it. (Trust me, you'll need them.)
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:33 PM   #55
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What would be a good next project, any suggestions? As I mentioned I've thought about doing some fingerless gloves too.
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:45 PM   #56
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Quote:
My crutch now seems to be holding them in a T formation with the right needle vertical. For some reason it feels comfortable I've been trying to force myself to hold them parallel to each other when I notice I'm going back to old habits.
I wouldn't call this a bad habit, hold the needles in a position that seems most comfortable for you. If you try to conform to what you thinks is 'normal' it may be tiring for you and distracting as well. I hold mine in a T at times, it depends on the stitch and needles; other times they're not really parallel but crossed at the tips and making a large X. There is no one absolute 'right' way to hold them, it's whatever works best for you.
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:47 PM   #57
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Well I don't want to hold them like that mainly due to my needles, they are round and the line connecting the two needles is a metal cable. I'm worried about fatigue on that connection between needle and cable and having that cable begin to fray from bending due to it resting on me.
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:57 PM   #58
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Originally Posted by dudeKnit View Post
What would be a good next project, any suggestions? As I mentioned I've thought about doing some fingerless gloves too.
Gloves -- even fingerless ones -- can get a little tricky when you get to the thumb gusset. Plus you'll probably have to do some small-diameter circular knitting (unless you find a pattern that's knit flat and seamed, in which case you'll have to figure out seaming). It's not that these things are actually hard to do, I'd just suggest learning them on something that's a little bigger with larger gauge.

As boring as it sounds, I'd tackle a basic hat next. If you do it from the top down, you'll do a lot of increases which will get you used to what you'll have to do for that gusset. You'll also end up doing some small diameter work (unless the pattern is flat and then seamed... see above).

But hey... if you feel comfortable jumping in, I'll be the last one to stop ya. I'm just offering the experience of someone who did things in what was probably the EXACT wrong order from the "If I'd known then what I know now" perspective. Especially if I'd been learning without the benefit of a girlfriend who does this for a living. I had the comfort of knowing I couldn't get myself into more trouble than she could get me out of.
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Old 01-14-2013, 03:15 PM   #59
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A good next project is whatever you want. My first real project was a hooded cardigan with pockets for my GS. I was motivated, he'd asked me to make it for him and picked out yarn he liked. It has front bands, one with buttonholes, that were seamed on. I didn't do set in sleeves, they were raglan. Far from perfect but he likes wearing it. Whatever you decide on, there is always help here, videos galore, and all kinds of printable instruction all over the internet. What's the worst that will happen? You'll set it aside and work on something else for a while or decide to frog and make something else. Either way, you'll learn valuable skills. I think there is one hard and fast principle when it comes to knitting: if it's not fun, it's not worth the effort.

One thing I found helpful in my earliest projects was using variegated yarn, it helps camouflage a multitude of unintented design features aka learning opportunities aka mistakes.
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Old 01-14-2013, 03:25 PM   #60
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I think I am kinda putting the cart in front of the horse. I've seen it time and time again with my rc you suggest something appropriate for their skill level and then they go for the jet anyway, it always ends in disaster for the plane.

I think I may take a look at a hat. It's also not like it'll be the last thing I ever knit right? Plus I'm bald so the hat would keep the dome warm!
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