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Old 06-13-2007, 12:22 PM   #1
AnnaT
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Is an inch of knitting an inch of knitting?
Hi,

I hope someone can explain this to my mathematically challenged self. I couldn't find a definitive answer anywhere.

I have started my first sweater, but am doing it at a different gauge than the pattern calls for which has resulted in headaches, sleeplessness, and swearing about having to deal with algebra again. My husband can do stuff like this in his head, so he helped me and I feel pretty confident about the calculations.

So, I think I have all my calculations correct, except for one. If my gauge is smaller, shouldn't I need more yarn? The yarn store lady where I shop didn't think so, that an inch of knitting is an inch of knitting, whether your stitches are larger or smaller (only here they say centimeters). But this doesn't sit right with me. I feel like I need more yarn at a smaller gauge.

Is this why I flunked Algebra I twice, all those years ago?
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Old 06-13-2007, 12:40 PM   #2
Orangeus
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It depends on how different your gauge is.

Like, if the sweater is supposed to get 5 rows per-inch, but you're knitting it at 10 rows per-inch, that's a HUGE difference, and the 10-row-per-inch peice will use up more yarn (twice as much I'd think). But if you're knitting at 4.75 rows per inch, then I'd just buy one or two extra skeins, depending on how much yardage you get out of them.
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Old 06-13-2007, 12:57 PM   #3
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I'm lousy at math, but I'd buy and extra skein or two and keep them aside and protected (from cats, children, etc). If you need them you have them, but if not you can return them. Check with your LYS about returns though first.
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Old 06-13-2007, 10:53 PM   #4
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If your gauge is smaller as in you have more sts per inch, you're going to be knitting more stitches. That will use up more yarn. Buying a couple extra sounds like a good idea.

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Old 06-13-2007, 11:51 PM   #5
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No, an inch is not an inch is not an inch of knitting. It depends on how different your gauge is, and also what you mean by "more". More in weight (grams/oz) or more in yardage? Finer gauged yarns get you a bit farther, you need less in weight of them, but this also means more yardage. For example (and I'm just making this up so don't take these numbers for real), say you were knitting a 10"x10" square. If you knit it in a super bulky yarn, say it would use 1 oz and take 30 yards. While if you knit a 10"x10" square in fingering weight yarn, it might only use 1/2 oz. but you need 60 yards. I hope I am being clear. In general, the finer gauge something is, the less weight of it you need and the more yards you need to make the same sized thing. There's a handy little table somewhere on the net that estimates how much yarn in weight and in yardage you will need for knitting different items, and it would show you what I mean, but I can't find it right now.

Are you actually using a finer gauge yarn, or is it the same weight as the recommended yarn and you are just doing it to different gauge?
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Old 06-14-2007, 01:14 AM   #6
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Thank you everyone!! I do have some extra, because I bought 900 meters (2 450-meter skeins) and the pattern called for 725 yards. But I am still worried about it and guess I will pick up one more skein. I am about 3/4 of the way through the back and seemingly halfway through the skein. So I was getting worried. However, it is a mohair blend, so it's pretty stretchy. I just couldn't decide what to think.


Originally Posted by mwedzi View Post
No, an inch is not an inch is not an inch of knitting. It depends on how different your gauge is, and also what you mean by "more". More in weight (grams/oz) or more in yardage? Finer gauged yarns get you a bit farther, you need less in weight of them, but this also means more yardage. For example (and I'm just making this up so don't take these numbers for real), say you were knitting a 10"x10" square. If you knit it in a super bulky yarn, say it would use 1 oz and take 30 yards. While if you knit a 10"x10" square in fingering weight yarn, it might only use 1/2 oz. but you need 60 yards. I hope I am being clear. In general, the finer gauge something is, the less weight of it you need and the more yards you need to make the same sized thing. There's a handy little table somewhere on the net that estimates how much yarn in weight and in yardage you will need for knitting different items, and it would show you what I mean, but I can't find it right now.

Are you actually using a finer gauge yarn, or is it the same weight as the recommended yarn and you are just doing it to different gauge?

Yes, I understand you. The yarn I am using is the same weight, but I am using smaller needles than the pattern called for, although they are still oversized for the yarn itself. The pattern's gauge is 10 sts and 14 rows = 4", and mine is 20 sts and 20 rows = 4".

I saw the chart you are talking about, I think. It gave rough yardage for different items. For an adult sweater, it estimated 1200 yards. This wasn't really helpful because the sweater I'm making is light and airy.
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Old 06-14-2007, 07:29 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by AnnaT View Post

he yarn I am using is the same weight, but I am using smaller needles than the pattern called for, although they are still oversized for the yarn itself. The pattern's gauge is 10 sts and 14 rows = 4", and mine is 20 sts and 20 rows = 4".
That's a big difference. and since it is the same weight to yardage as the original pattern, yes, you will need more in both yardage and weight. Sorry that I don't know how much more. But buying the extra ball is probably a good idea and, as long as you don't wind it, you can always return it if it turns out you don't need it.
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Old 06-14-2007, 10:56 AM   #8
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I'm not sure if this is the site mwedzi was talking about or not, but it helped me before....

http://www.planetshoup.com/easy/tips/yarnamts.shtml
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