Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-07-2007, 07:48 AM   #1
abby.elizabeth
Casting On
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 13
Thanks: 7
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
help! british knitting terms!
I'm using a pattern from a british knitting magazine, and there are a couple of terms that I'm not understanding. One is "yf" - yarn forward. I believe that this means a regular yarn over, right? The other is "yb" - yarn back. If "yf" is a regular yarn over, what does "yb" mean? Thanks for any help!
abby.elizabeth is offline   Reply With Quote

 

This advertising will not be shown to registered members. Join our free online community today!

Old 10-07-2007, 08:20 AM   #2
knitgal
Working the Gusset
 
knitgal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,710
Thanks: 1,249
Thanked 987 Times in 655 Posts
What is the pattern? Sometimes "yf" is yo but it may just mean bring the yarn forward while you do something else and "yarn back" while you do something to the other side.
For example with the ballband dishcloth, you want the slipped stitch to show. You never increase the stitches, you simply bring the yarn to the front of the work and then to the back
__________________
Ann

OTN: Corona, Miter square blanket, Charity blankets
FO: Forest Canopy Shawl, Easy Baby Bootees, Kitty Pi, Ms. Marigold, Twinkle Toes, Josh's socks, Hedera socks, Spring Beret, Ashley's Birthday socks, Socks for the DBF's mom, grey socks for the DBF, my first socks, reversible cable scarf, ribbed hat for the BF, Manos Del Uruguay afghan, and a whole bunch of dishcloths!


knitgal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2007, 09:46 AM   #3
suzeeq
Knit On!
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Montana
Posts: 27,765
Thanks: 160
Thanked 6,451 Times in 6,035 Posts
Send a message via Yahoo to suzeeq
If the pattern has slipped sts, yf and yb refer to bringing the yarn forward or to the back. If there's a knit st after the yf, it's a YO; if it's a slip st after, bring the yarn to the front.
__________________
sue- knitting heretic

suzeeq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2007, 10:48 AM   #4
GiddyKnitter
Working the Gusset
 
GiddyKnitter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: England
Posts: 1,265
Thanks: 338
Thanked 475 Times in 460 Posts
Send a message via AIM to GiddyKnitter Send a message via Yahoo to GiddyKnitter
Hi
It's as it says ...bring your yarn forward or take your yarn to the back xx
__________________
Pauline x x

OTN's
Socks for ME!!
February Ladies Sweater x 3
Knitted Kitties




Leahfaith on Ravelry
GiddyKnitter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2007, 12:01 AM   #5
hob
Knitting the Flap
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 422
Thanks: 10
Thanked 56 Times in 53 Posts
hi i might not be right if u could post a bit of the pattern it would help more what mag is it?
yf should just mean bring your yarn forward.... like in a purl st and yarn back put it back again. im am a brit and thats what it means to me.
hob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2007, 01:42 AM   #6
redwitch
Working the Gusset
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: NZ
Posts: 1,350
Thanks: 1
Thanked 182 Times in 160 Posts
You know how in single ribbing you have to bring the wool forward after the k before p, and back after p before a k? That's the movement they want you to make. Between two knit stitches a wool forward will create a yo, but just think of it as exactly what the instruction says.
redwitch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2007, 08:21 AM   #7
abby.elizabeth
Casting On
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 13
Thanks: 7
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
thanks, but...
i thought that was what it meant too. however, using it that way the instructions don't make sense. the magazine is simply knitting and the instructions read:

*k2tog, yf, k1, yf, skpo, k5, rep from*

so far so good. but the next line reads:

*k2tog, (k1,yf) twice, k1, skpo, k3, rep from*

sounds to me like a yarn over, wouldn't you say? but in the "abbreviations" section of the pattern, "yf" means yarn forward, and "yon" means yarn over needle. are you just as confused as i am now?

the pattern is for a bonnet, and it shows an eyelet pattern. i should also point out that nowhere in the pattern does it have the abbreviation yon. maybe i'm just reading too much into this. but this is the main pattern for a layette set and it's gorgeous.

anyway, thanks for all your help!
abby.elizabeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2007, 09:46 AM   #8
suzeeq
Knit On!
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Montana
Posts: 27,765
Thanks: 160
Thanked 6,451 Times in 6,035 Posts
Send a message via Yahoo to suzeeq
Both yf and yon mean YO; yf is used between 2 knit sts and yon is used between 2 purl sts. So just YO.
__________________
sue- knitting heretic

suzeeq is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to suzeeq For This Useful Post:
abby.elizabeth (10-08-2007)
Old 10-08-2007, 09:51 AM   #9
redwitch
Working the Gusset
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: NZ
Posts: 1,350
Thanks: 1
Thanked 182 Times in 160 Posts
No it's fine, it makes sense. Since you are not purling in this row, all those yfs are actually going to create yos, but if you were purling, that might not be the case.
So a yf is not necessarily the same as a yo, but in this case all the yfs are going to create yos. And if you find it easier, feel free to take yf to mean yo (in the context of the two lines you have given us at least).

It's possible that yon is the way they described a stitch that you would just call 'a yo after a purl, before a knit'.
redwitch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2007, 10:08 AM   #10
abby.elizabeth
Casting On
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 13
Thanks: 7
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
thank you!
that makes so much more sense! so in that context, a "yb" (yarn back) would be a yarn over between two purl stitches, right?

why can't they just say that!

thanks for all your help everyone!
abby.elizabeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help with knitting terms. Spoofehness How-to Questions 3 08-22-2009 12:28 AM
Knitting terms.. AnnaE How-to Questions 1 03-01-2009 09:41 PM
need help with knitting terms ladydorkness How-to Questions 5 10-13-2008 11:33 PM
Knitting Terms Lin How-to Questions 3 08-23-2006 09:22 AM
2 knitting terms clarified Tammy6071 How-to Questions 3 02-25-2006 02:42 PM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:40 AM.