Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-17-2008, 07:13 PM   #21
lactosefree
1st Leg of the Journey
 
lactosefree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 218
Thanks: 66
Thanked 66 Times in 52 Posts
Originally Posted by dustinac View Post
Also, for the continental purl I would suggest looking at Amy's Norwegian Purling video...

Thanks for posting this! I think the last time I looked at the purling video page the Norwegian style wasn't up yet. I it! Yay, a new way to purl!
__________________
Susan
Tales of an immunosuppressed knitter

lactosefree is offline   Reply With Quote

 

This advertising will not be shown to registered members. Join our free online community today!

Old 04-17-2008, 07:25 PM   #22
dustinac
2nd Sock, I Rock
 
dustinac's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Mountaineer knitter in Buckeye country
Posts: 9,817
Thanks: 2,489
Thanked 4,204 Times in 2,997 Posts
Originally Posted by suzeeq View Post
Yeah, I would think heavy yarn and large needles would be more difficult continental. I wonder.... do most contis use thin yarn and small needles more than english knitters do?
I tend to knit with thinner yarn...for some reason bulky and larger needles really hurt when I knit with them not really harder to do...just very uncomfy...I never thought to change to English though...I'll give that a try next time

Originally Posted by lactosefree View Post
Thanks for posting this! I think the last time I looked at the purling video page the Norwegian style wasn't up yet. I it! Yay, a new way to purl!
I was doing the continental purl and although I wasn't having any trouble with it, I didn't care much for it (I used my thumb 'cause my middle finger just wouldn't help that yarn over...so a few days ago I was looking around and found that video...I'm working on a top with a lot of purl sts and it's a lot easier/faster to do
__________________


A Mountaineer Knitter's Blog
dustinac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2008, 10:14 PM   #23
suzeeq
Knit On!
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Montana
Posts: 27,765
Thanks: 160
Thanked 6,451 Times in 6,035 Posts
Send a message via Yahoo to suzeeq
Quote:
I can not for the life of me figure out purling with the English method but doesn't really matter!
When purling english you use exactly the same motion over the needle as knitting. It's just that your tip is point to the front left instead of the back left.
__________________
sue- knitting heretic

suzeeq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2008, 10:16 PM   #24
Becky Morgan
Turning the Heel
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 631
Thanks: 62
Thanked 274 Times in 209 Posts
I'll have to put that video on my "when you go to the library that has broadband" list. Right now I'm halfway through a sweater in moss stitch and all that switching back and forth is driving me NUTS.

I agree with most of you--do what feels right, not what you think the Knitting Police want. If it doesn't hurt your hands and you're getting the result you (not anyone else, YOU) want, it's a Good Thing. TRying out new techniques is part of the fun, but if you don't like them, nobody is allowed to make you!

I learned to crochet first, too, and everyone around here seems to knit not only English, but with a wrist-twisting variation and very, very hard, tight gauge. That won't work for me. Thick yarn doesn't seem to be a problem,--I don't like a lot of the projects that are made with the clothesline-sized yarn and great big needles, but it isn't harder to work with or anything. Really fine yarn is more of a problem for these stiff hands--I can;t do much thread crochet, either.
__________________
Becky
Becky Morgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2008, 10:26 PM   #25
Constance123
Ribbing the Cuff
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 34
Thanks: 0
Thanked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Hi,
Constance here. I was an English knitter until I was 30. At that time I was living in Germany (AF wife). My landlandy saw me throwing my thread with my right hand and said "ach, you Americans, you waste so much time, here do it this way". She just took it from me and showed me the continental way. You have to let go of the grip and really knit looser. I hold my tension with my left index finger. It took me one solid year to stop picking up the knitting the English way. It takes forever. But finally you will forget the old English way. Stick with it. Make yourself do this. But releasing your work and knitting very loose will help a lot. You will find you like it a lot better. Also, working with only round needles has helped. Good Luck. Let me know how it's going.
Love
Constance
Constance123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2008, 07:29 AM   #26
zkimom
Working the Gusset
 
zkimom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Redding, CT
Posts: 1,414
Thanks: 140
Thanked 430 Times in 280 Posts
Ok, let me throw this onto the pile. I learned knitting continental (actually combined but I didn't know the difference at the time, all I knew was I held my yarn in my left hand) and I knit that way until last year when I wanted to start teaching knitting classes. I had heard that it was easier to learn knitting English style (although Kelley Petkun disagrees) and that's how both my kids were learning at school so I thought I'd give it a try.

I picked it up fairly quickly and now, I love knitting both ways. There's something very meditative and relaxing about doing a garter stitch scarf and knitting English. If I were to knit garter and use continental, I knit too fast and kind of miss the pleasure of the stitch along the way.

That being said, I don't purl well English style and much prefer continental for stitches that require me to mix knits and purls. That includes anything other than straight stockinette or garter.

Really, it's all about the knitting.

And I just wanted to add that my garter stitch is much more even since I've been knitting English. I never liked doing garter stitch continental style. My rows always came out kind of wonky and uneven. When I garter English style my rows are nice and straight. Maybe it has to do with the way the stitches sit on the needle when I knit them off but it's much easier for me to work them English.
__________________
I'm Zkimom on Ravelry

Check out my photoblog: Photobella

Well, I've wrestled with reality for 35 years, Doctor, and I'm happy to state I finally won out over it.
--Elwood P. Dodd
zkimom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2008, 07:35 AM   #27
gargoylelib
Turning the Heel
 
gargoylelib's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Tampere, Finland
Posts: 717
Thanks: 240
Thanked 176 Times in 150 Posts
Originally Posted by suzeeq View Post
When purling english you use exactly the same motion over the needle as knitting. It's just that your tip is point to the front left instead of the back left.
Yeah, I know this in theory but when it comes to the practice my
brain just sorta goes on holiday and I sit there with drool coming
out the side of my mouth! I can purl any way I've come
across so far in continental but for some reason english does
not click.

Libbie
__________________
I tinK, therefore I am

gargoylelib on Ravelry
gargoylelib is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2008, 08:57 AM   #28
suzeeq
Knit On!
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Montana
Posts: 27,765
Thanks: 160
Thanked 6,451 Times in 6,035 Posts
Send a message via Yahoo to suzeeq
Silly Libbie ! hee hee
__________________
sue- knitting heretic

suzeeq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2008, 01:05 PM   #29
1to1
Turning the Heel
 
1to1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Illinois
Posts: 628
Thanks: 210
Thanked 248 Times in 159 Posts
I learned English and every now and then will knit Cont but then switch back. I know that I need to stick with it longer (like for a whole dishcloth) but it seems that when I finish a row I switch back on the next row without realizing it.

IMO, I honestly don't think any one way is better but agree that it is useful to know many different ways.
__________________
Carla
1to1 blog

1to1
1to1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2008, 11:06 PM   #30
rox_on2
Ribbing the Cuff
 
rox_on2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Northville Michigan
Posts: 34
Thanks: 7
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Wow, I didn't expect such response!
Thank you all for your input!

I really don't mind my throwing style that much as I am very comfortable.
I probably wouldn't ever know the difference, were it not for the internet. Seeing how others do it though, made me realise it can be done more efficiently/faster! So I just want to learn it.

I had my knitting with me at work today and my Irish client whom I know to be a knitter was asking about the project I'm working on. I'm doing 2 toe up on 1 circ magic loop.
I whatched her doing some knitting last time she was in and was quite impressed. She holds her yarn in her right hand but doesn't throw, but rather shifts the yarn using her right index finger, much like you might do in continental....
Anyway, she wanted to understand what I was doing with the magic loop so I had her do some stitches her way meanwhile I showed her what I've been practicing to learn conti.

It was fun!
I'm gonna keep at it and one day I'll be a pro!

Thanks again
rox_on2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Benefits to learning continental knitting? TrueIconoclast General Knitting 35 02-03-2011 02:14 AM
Learning new techniques: from English to continental to ? combined ? AniseRN What'cha Knittin'? 6 04-20-2010 03:17 PM
this hat is KILLING me. i am so stuck. hheartstrongg How-to Questions 23 03-19-2009 02:40 PM
Learning continental knitting BeckyBeth General Knitting 16 05-22-2008 02:44 PM
Learning to Purl Continental MAmaDawn How-to Questions 7 06-15-2007 08:48 AM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:15 AM.