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Old 06-04-2008, 11:48 PM   #1
Mike
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Blocking Acrylics, proof it can be done
This is Lion Jiffy 100% acrylic before and after steaming.
I used #5 needles (supposed to use #10) so it would be extra hard and curled.
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Old 06-05-2008, 12:28 AM   #2
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So...you took a steamer to it? Or did you use an iron with steam??
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Old 06-05-2008, 01:01 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Crycket View Post
So...you took a steamer to it? Or did you use an iron with steam??
A steamer. My iron is a hand-me-down, I think from before steam was invented
I bought the steamer for blocking.

I'm not familiar with steam irons to know how much steam they push but I've heard of people using them just to blow steam and not to press in order to block.
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Old 06-05-2008, 01:44 AM   #4
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I've successfully blocked acrylics doing both the pin/mist method and iron steaming (with pressing cloth). LOVE the colorway on your Jiffy yarn!

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Old 06-05-2008, 05:08 AM   #5
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I've always wondered and have done a few small pieces myself (blocking them I mean) but it still left me wondering. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 06-05-2008, 12:29 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by cam90066 View Post
I've successfully blocked acrylics doing both the pin/mist method and iron steaming (with pressing cloth). LOVE the colorway on your Jiffy yarn!

cam
I've never tried spritzing or soaking because I don't have anywhere to lay flat until dried without it becoming a dog blanket or birds doing their thing on it. I barely have enough room to lay out wool hats and socks to dry.
I like steam because it's dry in a few minutes. Some may not like what it does to the yarn, which I've seen described as "killing", but I think the soft drape steaming gives is exactly why people buy natural fibers.

I've ruined a nylon blend with steam. It shrank and got hard.

I don't know why there's a wives tale about acrylics and blocking, if it's an anti-acrylic thing or if it just seems to make sense. To me it makes more sense that natural is least likely to permanently block, when I had curly hair I sure wasn't ever able to block it straight.

I hope this convinces KH members that acrylic does block.

The color of the Jiffy is El Paso.
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Old 06-05-2008, 12:47 PM   #7
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Well, when acrylic/synthetich yarns became popular in the 60s, one of their selling points was you didn't have to block them. And yeah, you can `kill' it, the items become softer and more drapey. I just toss my acrylic stuff in the washer and dryer, they're fine.
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Old 06-05-2008, 01:51 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by suzeeq View Post
Well, when acrylic/synthetich yarns became popular in the 60s, one of their selling points was you didn't have to block them. And yeah, you can `kill' it, the items become softer and more drapey. I just toss my acrylic stuff in the washer and dryer, they're fine.
That explains where the idea it can't be done comes from.

It's sure easier to seam flat pieces together than trying to seam around the curls.
I like to kitchener as much as I can so I don't think washing the panels with straight needles and stitch holders would be a good idea (I thought there was a tangled mess smilie, if there was I would've put it here)

The washer and dryer does take care of the curl in blankets. But if the gauge changed from start to finish it won't make them square.
I have squared up panels with steam.
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Old 06-05-2008, 02:16 PM   #9
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Quote:
Some may not like what it does to the yarn, which I've seen described as "killing", but I think the soft drape steaming gives is exactly why people buy natural fibers.
When I've misted, it's more about shaping and was pleased with the results. But when I DO want that bit of 'kill'...for the acrylics that need to be softened a lot and given drape....the steaming has worked well. I did two cable scarves in super cheap acrylic and they were literally stiff...and the cables were curling and pulling. After steaming, the scarves were nice and soft, pliable, and worth wearing.

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Old 06-05-2008, 02:27 PM   #10
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Quote:
It's sure easier to seam flat pieces together than trying to seam around the curls.
I avoid seams, knitting tops and sweaters in the round. For flat things like throws, scarves or shawls, I use a garter border around the edges so they don't curl.
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