Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-30-2008, 12:25 AM   #1
saracidaltendencies
Working the Gusset
 
saracidaltendencies's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: knittinghelp.com
Posts: 1,919
Thanks: 955
Thanked 1,090 Times in 608 Posts
Need Help Identifying A Tree
The pic I have is pretty crappy...Anyway, they are driving me crazy and I want to get rid of them...no matter how many times I cut them down, they ALWAYS grow back and they're taking over my backyard. The pic was taken before the trees took over my backyard.

Here's a description of them as well:

The trunk and uh...stem? of the tree is quite thin...It is more of a tan-ish color and when the trees are small the branches are kind of soft and green. They smell really weird too. The leaves are elongated and a dark green, the branches are thin, and, the leaves are horizontal to each other on either side of the branches. As far as I know, the trees weren't planted, they grow wild just behind my backyard, but, they have begun growing IN my backyard and are impossible to get rid of! I live in Missouri and I've been looking at trees in Missouri, but, no luck finding this particular kind. It seems more like some kind of weed tree the way it just takes over and is so difficult to completely remove. Any guesses as to the type of tree and how to remove them would be appreciated!
Attached Thumbnails:
Click image for larger version

Name:	092100012.jpg
Views:	195
Size:	104.2 KB
ID:	48555  
__________________
--The member formerly known as Demonica

"You must be the change you wish to see in the world."
- Mahatma Gandhi
saracidaltendencies is offline   Reply With Quote

 

This advertising will not be shown to registered members. Join our free online community today!

Old 05-30-2008, 02:28 AM   #2
Jan in CA
Moderator
Mod Squad
 
Jan in CA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Southern CA
Posts: 37,206
Thanks: 1,660
Thanked 8,761 Times in 7,129 Posts
Wow, I sure don't know. I asked DH and he didn't know either, but he said it may be something that comes up from the roots like bamboo in which some varieties can also be invasive.

I found a few websites that may or may not help.

http://www.mipn.org/
http://www.mobot.org/mobot/research/mepp/ratings.shtml
http://www.centerforplantconservatio....html#Missouri
http://www.easywildflowers.com/invasive.htm
http://www.invasivespecies.net/datab...i=-1&x=10&y=13
Also you might consider contacting the horticultural society or something like that.. maybe a local university.
__________________
Jan

When asking questions ALWAYS post the name and a link for the pattern if you have it.

NEW! KH knitting video archive
~HOW TO POST A PHOTO~

Jan in CA is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Jan in CA For This Useful Post:
saracidaltendencies (05-30-2008)
Old 05-30-2008, 03:17 AM   #3
Debkcs
Instepping Out
 
Debkcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Salem, OR
Posts: 2,919
Thanks: 384
Thanked 1,281 Times in 1,192 Posts
It doesn't look like any bamboo I'm familiar with, but does the bark have any rings around it? Too bad your winters haven't been bad enough lately to kill it off.
__________________
I LOVE THIS SITE!

"All good things and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of Lights who cannot change."
James 1:17
Debkcs is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Debkcs For This Useful Post:
saracidaltendencies (05-30-2008)
Old 05-30-2008, 05:35 AM   #4
jess_hawk
Working the Gusset
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,252
Thanks: 950
Thanked 583 Times in 402 Posts
I would need a better look to give you a definite answer, although the leaves appear to be very long compound pinnate which is unique (see my note at the bottom). Your best bet would be to take a leaf AND STEM clipping to a local university, garden center, or nursery (or high school bio or ag teacher). My plant tax prof once spent twenty minutes explaining to us how annoying it was when people bring him just a leaf and ask what it is, as many plants have very similar leaves but can be differentiated by the leaf scars, bark, or wood (and by the way, if those are compound leaves, make sure you get the WHOLE leaf not just a leaflet).
A lot of species reproduce by root clones and many will sprout again from a cut stump. My mom had a rosebush that my parents decided to get rid of and spent about five years pouring so much poison on the stupid thing (and cutting it, burning it, and so on) that to this day grass won't grow within three feet of that garden (dad digs out the old dirt and puts in new every year so we can get some flowers to grow).



OK having said all that, I think your plant MAY be a sumac:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sumac
Sorry no idea how to get rid of it, but anyplace that knows herbicides should be able to help you. If you can't find anyplace I'll interogate my brother, his specialty at work was always herbicides and fertilizers (we worked at the same hardware store).
__________________
recent FOs: Shedir cap, Bricks of Atlantis, Pirates Hat, Citrine Socklets, Teddy bears, 1 entrelac sock
OTN: scraps blanket, Shedir for Teenie, Ice Serpent Hat
NIL: Qiviuk tam re-visited; weatherproof gloves; sweaters
My knitting blog: http://emilai333.wordpress.com/
jess_hawk is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to jess_hawk For This Useful Post:
saracidaltendencies (05-30-2008)
Old 05-30-2008, 07:22 AM   #5
CountryKitty
Knitting the Flap
 
CountryKitty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 283
Thanks: 64
Thanked 105 Times in 95 Posts
Staghorn Sumac is a very invasive shrub/small tree known for growing into dense thickets by producing 'suckers' from the roots (sprouts that become trees). The first link is a page of information on Staghorn Sumac complete with pictures, the next 2 show closer shots of the leaves.

http://www.paghat.com/sumac.html
http://babel.lss.wisc.edu/~sara/pict...mac_colors.jpg
http://www.naturephoto-cz.com/photos...umac-32024.jpg
__________________
"Happiness is a ball of yarn." ---{=^;^=}
CountryKitty is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to CountryKitty For This Useful Post:
saracidaltendencies (05-30-2008)
Old 05-30-2008, 08:51 AM   #6
cftwo
Working the Gusset
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: PA
Posts: 1,043
Thanks: 32
Thanked 308 Times in 289 Posts
Originally Posted by jess_hawk View Post
Your best bet would be to take a leaf AND STEM clipping to a local university, garden center, or nursery (or high school bio or ag teacher). My plant tax prof once spent twenty minutes explaining to us how annoying it was when people bring him just a leaf and ask what it is, as many plants have very similar leaves but can be differentiated by the leaf scars, bark, or wood (and by the way, if those are compound leaves, make sure you get the WHOLE leaf not just a leaflet).
I agree with Jess!
cftwo is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to cftwo For This Useful Post:
saracidaltendencies (05-30-2008)
Old 05-30-2008, 02:21 PM   #7
saracidaltendencies
Working the Gusset
 
saracidaltendencies's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: knittinghelp.com
Posts: 1,919
Thanks: 955
Thanked 1,090 Times in 608 Posts
It definitely does look like a Sumac, but, the trees here never have any flowers and the leaves don't really change color, they just get a little yellowish and fall off...lol...I'm going to look into more Sumacs though, thanks everyone for all the help!
__________________
--The member formerly known as Demonica

"You must be the change you wish to see in the world."
- Mahatma Gandhi
saracidaltendencies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2008, 07:08 PM   #8
bjc1050
Turning the Heel
 
bjc1050's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Winchester, VA
Posts: 745
Thanks: 133
Thanked 66 Times in 56 Posts
They might possibly locust trees. We thought we'd never get rid of the ones in our yard. There always seemed to be so many volunteers from spreading roots and seeds, too. Our locust trees had thorns which I reallly hated. Some varieties don't have thorns. I wouldn't have minded them so much if ours were thornless. All I can say is that it tooks years of diligently keeping after the volunteers and getting as much of the roots as possible.
__________________
Beverly
Always a beginner...sometimes I even finish.
Every project is a new beginning.

http://crochetbydayknitterbynight.blogspot.com/


Gen 8:22

While the earth remaineth, seedtime and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day and night shall not cease
KJV
bjc1050 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to bjc1050 For This Useful Post:
saracidaltendencies (05-30-2008)
Old 05-31-2008, 11:51 PM   #9
knitasha
Turning the Heel
 
knitasha's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: 10024
Posts: 930
Thanks: 23
Thanked 288 Times in 240 Posts
It looks a lot like the locusts that invade my planters, which happen to be on a 17th-story rooftop in New York City. Roots like iron.

It also resembles ailanthus, the "Tree of Heaven" that was immortalized in "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn." The male flowers smell like cat urine. (When I was a kid we called them "stinkweed." However, these trees grow rapidly and top out at 30-40 feet.

If you want an authoritative i.d., though, Jess has the right idea.
__________________
BaaBaa on Ravelry
knitasha is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to knitasha For This Useful Post:
saracidaltendencies (06-01-2008)
Old 06-01-2008, 01:02 AM   #10
saracidaltendencies
Working the Gusset
 
saracidaltendencies's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: knittinghelp.com
Posts: 1,919
Thanks: 955
Thanked 1,090 Times in 608 Posts
Yeah, I found some info on the Tree of Heaven and it looks so much like it, but, I also read the Tree of Heaven sprouts fruits and the trees I have here never have any "fruit" or flowery looking growth, just leaves.

They do smell really odd, the trees. When it gets really hot out, that's all I smell. I wouldn't say they stink, but, it's a really weird smell that makes it difficult for me to breathe if I'm too close to them. Not like an allergy type thing but makes my breathing very irregular and I have to move away from them to breathe properly.

I'm going to get more pictures tomorrow, it's driving me nuts trying to figure out what this is! lol...I have to get rid of them...No matter how many times I cut them down, they, as mentioned by jess_hawk, just keep sprouting up again. And I mean it quite literally when I say they're taking over my backyard! Last year I cut them all down in the summer and they began growing back quickly. I wanted to get out there and cut them down before the spring, when all the trees were still bare, but, with all the rain we've had, and, having my 3 year old son with me all day, I didn't get a chance to go out there before they all bloomed again :( However, no plans for tomorrow, and, I think the weather is actually supposed to be nice so I may just do that all day tomorrow!
__________________
--The member formerly known as Demonica

"You must be the change you wish to see in the world."
- Mahatma Gandhi
saracidaltendencies is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Identifying yarn gingerfuzzball How-to Questions 4 06-21-2009 11:04 AM
Need help identifying yarn Cougar1 General Knitting 3 10-13-2008 09:53 PM
Help identifying a pattern?? jenarita Pattern Central 8 10-30-2007 11:53 AM
Help identifying stitch jmp3775 General Knitting 7 03-01-2007 06:26 PM
Identifying wool... eladine General Knitting 3 12-07-2006 07:48 PM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:31 AM.