Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-05-2008, 11:21 AM   #1
Ronda
Instepping Out
 
Ronda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 2,103
Thanks: 146
Thanked 373 Times in 358 Posts
Send a message via MSN to Ronda Send a message via Yahoo to Ronda
My gauge swatches.
First of all, please excuse the bad photography. I just charged my battery, but it was showing low battery on the camera anyway. I need a new camera.

With both of these swatches, I used KnitPicks Essential sock yarn. I used KP Harmony DPN in size 3. The only difference is the top swatch was English knitting, and the bottom was Continental.

English gauge: 8 or 9 stitches per inch. (I can't tell - bad eyesight - need new glasses.)
Continental gauge: 6 stitches per inch.

I love Continental, but I'm so sloppy with it! See the holes? Those are NOT dropped stitches. I think those are from my tension being way too loose. I'm constantly picking up the thread again and re-wrapping it around my finger to get the tension again. The yarn slips up my pinkie finger as I knit, making my tension too loose. If I wrap twice, then i'm too tight and I can't pull the yarn through my fingers at all. When I knit Continental, my stitches are so loose they just glide right off the needle. When I knit English, I often have to fight with the yarn.

I would like to stick with Continental, but I'm a much neater knitter with English.

Any comments, suggestions, etc. would be appreciated.
Attached Thumbnails:
Click image for larger version

Name:	2914540349_b1cce8e76b.jpg
Views:	203
Size:	102.9 KB
ID:	50288  
__________________
Ronda is offline   Reply With Quote

 

This advertising will not be shown to registered members. Join our free online community today!

Old 10-05-2008, 12:45 PM   #2
suzeeq
Knit On!
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Montana
Posts: 27,765
Thanks: 160
Thanked 6,450 Times in 6,035 Posts
Send a message via Yahoo to suzeeq
I think most continental knitters tend to be looser and have to go down needle sizes. You can keep practicing, use leftover yarn and different needles just to practice and see if your tension tightens up.
__________________
sue- knitting heretic

suzeeq is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to suzeeq For This Useful Post:
Ronda (10-05-2008)
Old 10-05-2008, 01:28 PM   #3
tarrentella
Working the Gusset
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,085
Thanks: 201
Thanked 264 Times in 225 Posts
im the opposite. I normally knit continental and my tension is normally on the tight side, not a lot but often requiring slightly larger needles. When i try and knit English style it is very loose and sloppy.

This is mainly a result of me being less competent with English style and finding it difficult to keep a ood tension on the working yarn.

I think i were to practice it more then i would have less of discreprancy between the two.
__________________
Sophie.





I am Tarriknits on Ravelry

This is my not necassarily knitting related blog.
tarrentella is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to tarrentella For This Useful Post:
Ronda (10-05-2008)
Old 10-05-2008, 01:43 PM   #4
suzeeq
Knit On!
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Montana
Posts: 27,765
Thanks: 160
Thanked 6,450 Times in 6,035 Posts
Send a message via Yahoo to suzeeq
Quote:
I think i were to practice it more then i would have less of discreprancy between the two.
Yes I think that goes for everyone; when you practice the less familiar style, you get better at keeping an even tension and there is not so much difference between the two after a while.
__________________
sue- knitting heretic

suzeeq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2008, 05:09 PM   #5
teachermom
1st Leg of the Journey
 
teachermom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: East Coast
Posts: 148
Thanks: 31
Thanked 70 Times in 53 Posts
I only knit conentinal - I do hold my yarn a bit differently than shown by most conentinal instructions....

I don't wrap the yarn around my pinkie - I wrap it around my index finger.... it goes between my pinkie and ring finger, over the back of my hand and around my index finger twice... I then use my index finger to wrap the yarn around the needed to make the stitch - I do still have to re-thread my yarn around my hand from time to time, but I find it is easier to control the tension with my index finger.

I also knit loose and have to go down several needle sizes to get the gauge I need.

Keep trying and good luck.
teachermom is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to teachermom For This Useful Post:
Ronda (10-05-2008)
Old 10-06-2008, 03:38 AM   #6
Amberle
1st Leg of the Journey
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 101
Thanks: 23
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
I think in one of the videos here on KH, Amy does a stranded colorwork tutorial holding one color in the Continental style and one in the English style. It's a bit fiddly at first, but you get used to it. If you've got time, you could practice this and see if you can iron out your gauge issues.

P.S. gauge is a tricky thing, don't let it get you down
Amberle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 03:48 AM   #7
Amberle
1st Leg of the Journey
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 101
Thanks: 23
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
P.P.S. holes between stitches are not always a problem. (Think of lace, it's all holes! :D)

It's more important to have even tension (i.e. that your gauge remains constant throughout a piece), than to not have holes between stitches. Those gaps could be an important part of the airy fabric you're trying to make.

In every knitted item you make, the thickness of the yarn and the gauge you knit it at both influence the fabric you end up with. Thus, both of your swatches above are acceptable fabrics, it depends on what you're trying to make: a super tight fabric could stop bullets and won't drape well, and a really loose one will let in the breeze.

So really, just practice until you find a style you feel comfortable with and then adjust the needle/yarn size to get the appropriate gauge!
Amberle is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Amberle For This Useful Post:
Ronda (10-06-2008)
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fewer gauge swatches: which strategies work for you? amy General Knitting 22 03-26-2010 08:12 PM
Gauge swatches Mommy22alyns General Knitting 11 05-18-2007 05:55 PM
What is the deal with my gauge swatches? Lousli How-to Questions 8 10-29-2006 03:37 PM
when making swatches to check for gauge... azalea General Knitting 2 03-21-2006 06:18 PM
Use for those 4 x 4 gauge swatches Louine General Knitting 5 03-06-2006 11:36 AM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:57 AM.