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Old 02-02-2009, 03:14 PM   #31
Mike
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Originally Posted by themonkeygirl View Post
I'm doing better but I still have difficulty getting my stitches to be a consistent size. Any tips on this?
Make sure you're wrapping them around the part of the hook that is a consistent size.
Don't wrap around the flare for the finger/thumb grip and don't wrap in the throat of the hook.

Other than that it's practice getting your tension steady. I found almost having no tension is what got me crocheting correctly.
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Old 02-02-2009, 04:39 PM   #32
OffJumpsJack
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Originally Posted by themonkeygirl View Post
I'm doing better but I still have difficulty getting my stitches to be a consistent size. Any tips on this?
How do you hold your yarn? As a crocheter learning to knit, I found the knitting style shown here on KH videos (wrapping the pinky then behind the other three fingers was making my knitting too tight.

I reverted to my crochet style of weaving the working yarn over (behind) my index, under (in front) my middle, over (behind) ring, and under (in front) of pinky was better as I had already learned to hold the yarn loosely in this way. Index finger extended and pinky loose while holding work with thumb, middle, and ring fingers. Using this method you keep the pinky slightly extended for a looser stitch.

To take up slack and tightens the loop on the hook, you squeeze the pinky and extend the index finger. To get more slack in the working yarn, extend your pinky then extend your index finger. If my stitches use more yarn (like DC or Tr) I also have to pull my hand closer to me and farther away from the skein.

Finnal thought is for hooks like the Boye style with a more tapered head/hook you will need to always push the hook through the loop until it is on the full sized shaft. Susan Bates hooks don't have this tapered shape.

HTH.

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Old 02-03-2009, 05:12 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by themonkeygirl View Post
I'm doing better but I still have difficulty getting my stitches to be a consistent size. Any tips on this?
If they are too loose, add another wrap to your yarn. I go over and under two fingers of my left hand. If they are too tight, try a different, looser wrap. I've found that I need more tension on my yarn with knitting than I do with crochet. Other than that, just practice, practice, practice. After so many years of practice I can crochet an entire afghan now with exactly the same gauge from beginning to end. You will, too, you'll see!!
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Old 02-03-2009, 09:02 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by mathwizard View Post
I love doing both! I do find that sometimes the language for either can trip me up. Some writers of patterns I think get paid for the word as I don't always see why it is repeated and then they put ** around it to repeat it again. Make it simple to read has always been my complaint.
I think it has more to do with 'real estate' than anything else, especially in magazines. If they wrote out every word, the pattern would be much too long to fit in a book or magazine.
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Old 02-03-2009, 09:27 PM   #35
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What a gorgeous ode to crochet!

I must say, though, that I actually prefer knitting to crochet....and I have been crocheting since I was 10 years old (I just learned how to knit a year ago!) and have made many memorable things with crochet.

Being used to two (or more! I am learning how to make socks right now) needles, it just feels kinda weird going back to one hook. And I just want to say, the only crochet stictches I really enjoyed were the afgan stitch and the pineapple stich

Plus, the needles come in hady as a weapon when I am coming home late on the train
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Old 02-09-2009, 02:53 PM   #36
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Knitting for me is just so much more natural, maybe because I don't have to hold the yarn at all. I look completely spastic when I'm trying to crochet. Maybe I should just go ahead and grab a project and see what happens.
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Old 02-09-2009, 06:18 PM   #37
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It is Different.
I guess my point was that Crochet is different and one shouldn't expect to be able to crochet just because one is a very good knitter.

It is okay if you have difficulty, just be patient, practice, and ask for specific help when you kneed it. Pick up some easy knitting to wash away frustration. Then see if you or a crocheter can identify what is causing you trouble and offer a way through (different method, clearer example, or step-by-step instruction).

Remember to swatch! One of the best thing you get from a swatch is practice on the stitch, pattern, or method (well, other than a FO that actually fits and looks like it should).

Start out with easy projects like pot holders, dish clothes, scarves, and hats. Use these "swatch like" projects to learn new stitches. After awhile you'll be making doilies and table clothes, blankets and sweaters, orhat ever you like.

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