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Old 02-01-2009, 07:55 PM   #11
TooCircular
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I've never seen that one, Ruthie. Thanks for sharing it, and have a great week!

Jan
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Old 02-01-2009, 08:00 PM   #12
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Yes, that's a very good point, Pat. Will definitely keep it in mind.
Thanks!

Jan
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Old 02-02-2009, 03:05 PM   #13
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Hi there!
There's been a lot of great tips given already. My two cents is in response to your uncertainty about whether to teach the continental method. I think you should teach what you are most comfortable in doing (which i gather is continental) because your comfort level will have an effect on your student's confidence. Learning any new skill is difficult, so I suspect the student would see both methods as equally confusing or difficult at the start. What's important to keep in mind is not to overwhelm him/her with too many things at first.
Happy knitting (and teaching)!
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Old 02-02-2009, 04:02 PM   #14
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Thanks for weighing in, K. I gotta tell you though, I'm still not sure which way to go on that. Seems like it took me forever to learn the continental method, and only after watching the video here at KH many many many times. I'm very comfortable with it now, though.

Appreciate your thoughts~ thanks for taking the time to write!

Jan
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Old 02-04-2009, 10:59 AM   #15
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Even though I use the Continental method myself, I always start someone out with the English (or whatever it's called) method - holding the yarn in the right hand. Most of the instruction books use/teach that method. If they want to know how I do it, then I show them, but only after they've gotten fairly proficient on the Right handed method first.
I usually start someone out with light colored yarn and size 10 needles. I have also bought booklets at the craft stores called, "Teach Me to Knit" or "Teaching a Group of Kids to Knit" and "I Can Knit - 11 Cool Knit Projects for Preteen Girls". They have tons of teaching tips/pointers in those types of books for both the students and the teachers.
HTH, knitcindy
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Old 02-04-2009, 11:14 AM   #16
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Thanks, Knitcindy! I'll have to look for those books, probably on Amazon.

Well, now I'll feel better about ditching the continental method in favor of the english. No use over-complicating matters, right? I guess I just needed to hear it from somebody else.

Thanks again for your thoughts and advice. Appreciate it~

Jan
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Old 02-04-2009, 01:49 PM   #17
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People seem most frustrated by learning to cast on and working the first few rows. Until you get a little knitting below the needles, they tend to slide out and flop around a little. I cast on about 15-20 stitches and knit 10 rows, put in a lifeline, knit a couple more rows, then show them how to do the knit stitch. I think it's important to show the knit stitch, stitch orientation and how to pick up a dropped stitch, and how to turn your work at the end of the row without getting those pesky "extra" stitches during the first session.
As to teaching Continental or English, I say to go with what you're most comfortable teaching.
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Old 02-04-2009, 03:54 PM   #18
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Great information, Denise. Thanks for taking the time to share. I'll tell ya, who needs a "how to" book when I've got you guys!

Thanks again,
Jan
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Old 02-04-2009, 05:54 PM   #19
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I was going to suggest what Denise said. I taught several ladies (some were middle teens) and I had knitted up a little piece for each of them to start on. They all said they appreciated it. After they had the knit stitch down and felt like they were getting somewhere I had them rip out the whole works and taught them to cast on and they all said they were glad they didn't start with that, and that first row of knitting from the cast on row, since it was harder.

I taught all these gals to do Continental from the beginning. I prefer that method and told them I wanted them to try it. It turned out they had all crocheted before so they had the hard part down already (how to hold the yarn). They all did well with it. But I taught my husband to knit a few years ago and I taught him the Continental knit stitch, but when we got to the purl he couldn't do it and to keep him from giving up I had him switch to English and he said that was much easier. If I teach young children I like to teach English because it is physically easier in my opinion.
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Old 02-04-2009, 08:39 PM   #20
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Hey there Merigold, thanks for responding. I'll definitely save the cast on for later! I was just looking back through all the responses and realized that I really need to write all of these hints and tips down along with the pros and cons. There's lots of good stuff here!

Appreciate your taking the time to write along with the hints and suggestions.

Jan
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