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Old 07-24-2009, 03:44 PM   #11
stitchabit
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My grandfather did crochet. My mother, grandmother and aunt did not crochet or knit . My sister taught me to knit when I was somewhere between 6-8 years of age.
It is interesting to think about. I have delved ( not sure that is exactly the word I want here) into sewing , counted cross stitch, crochet, knitting and some other crafts. However, my mother did none of these things. I only remember her reading after work at night or during her free time and then that was mostly the newspaper. She did not really start reading books until she retired. It is sad to look back now and realize I don't remember her really doing anything for enjoyment when she worked - just worked- came home - read the paper-watched a little tv and then went to bed. My mom died this past December and it seems that I am now just getting to know her.
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Old 07-24-2009, 03:46 PM   #12
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Aw. Don't feel bad about that, Rose. That's often the case for many people, actually.
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Old 07-24-2009, 05:25 PM   #13
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I think it's a bit sad that "crafty" has lost its connection with "craftsman" or "craftswoman", actually. "Crafty" these days seems to resound with echoes of knitting your own tofu, which is a shame, given that being a "craftsperson" should be an accolade.
I think you are right the wording is all in the context and what one associates with that. Some people think "hand made" or "hand knitted" sounds better than "home made". Interesting really.

Years ago, before I began knitting, I painted my daughters room and stamped flowers on the wall...one of my few forays into a craft store at the time. A friend saw it and said "I didn't know you were crafty!" At the time I didn't know I was either, still don't really think so, it was just decorating and making something nice for my daughter.
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Old 07-25-2009, 07:05 AM   #14
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Goodness what a response!

I am interested by how many other people have gone back through their history to wonder as I did. Of course, it also depends on the culture you came from. I have a photograph of my maternal grandmother (Irish) and her siblings from circa 1910. They are all wearing matching pinafores and I was informed that their own mother had sheared their own sheep, spun the yarn, weaved the cloth, cut and sewn the pinafores and knitted the socks - for 9 children!!!!! And I consider going to Pennys had work cos I have to drive for an hour.

Zina - my Aunt laughed at me and the Magic Loop and said she could never work circular needles either and said she would teach me to use DPNs next time we call - maybe that is more evidence of some genetic/blood relationship with knitting?

Rose - my own Mum passed away 12 years ago and I only began to understand her when I became a mother. My holiday this week was staying at the house where she grew up (her brother still lives there) I could practically see and smell her there.

I wonder would some University in the world let me do a thesis on this topic- I have lots of material already!
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Old 07-25-2009, 10:05 AM   #15
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Perhaps the inclination towards such work may run in the family, but the specifics are obviously learned. Many of my male ancestors in Ireland were master knitters prior to the industrial revolution although as far as I know none of my contemporary male relatives are involved in such work. A number of them are artists, musicians, etc. so perhaps it's an artistic inclination?
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Old 07-25-2009, 10:08 AM   #16
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I knit, my mother knit, my grandmother knit...but my sister will/can not.

I have a friend that wants me to knit for her...cause she "just can't seem to get the hang of it..." She is adopted, and her adoptive parents do not knit...but we don't know about her birth mother...so...maybe there is something to it!
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Old 07-25-2009, 11:25 AM   #17
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maybe that is more evidence of some genetic/blood relationship with knitting?
Nah, my bet is it's just unfamiliarity. I still think if you and I were in the same room, I could show you how to do it in under 60 seconds.
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Old 07-25-2009, 12:47 PM   #18
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My mom doesn't know how to knit, but she's always been very handicrafty. Growing up and seeing that a lot kept me interested in it. I wanted to learn to knit specifically because it was the one thing my multitalented mom couldn't do. A worthy goal. Now both of my girls see me knitting and crocheting and keep saying how much they want to learn.
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Old 07-28-2009, 02:57 PM   #19
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Both of my grandmothers crocheted and embroidered. As far as I know, neither one of them knitted. My mother tried embroidery (probably to please them), but didn't stick with it. She also tried something called "mod podge" back in the '60s. We all took ceramic classes, but that was too expensive. My mom neither knitted nor crocheted. I learned to crochet from a neighbor lady's teenage sister. I learned to knit from a school friend. I taught myself to do crewel and counted cross stitch. As you can see, needlecrafts are my favorite pastimes.

I have two daughters. They're both creative, but neither one is interested in knitting or crocheting. My younger daughter learned to knit, but not by me. A friend taught her. She likes knowing how, but would much rather draw, paint, or cook. She's very good at all of those. My older daughter tried to learn to crochet, but didn't have the patience. She too is very good at drawing and painting. She loves to cook and bake. For awhile, she dabbled in beading.

My husband is a very creative person too. He likes to draw, but his best talent, artistically, is woodworking.

I think it's a little of both nature and nurture.
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Old 07-28-2009, 03:41 PM   #20
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All of my sisters do fiber arts (knitting/crocheting/sewing/quilting/tatting/etc)

My mom and both of her sisters do fiber arts of various kinds

my maternal grandmother was quite the quilter and made needle lace. I THINK she knit, but I don't know for sure. She was into other things by the time I knew her well

my maternal grandmother's mother got a certificate from a correspondence school in some sort of fiber art. I have some of her tatting. My mom has some of her crocheted lace.

my maternal grandfather's mother did needlepoint, IIRC

My paternal grandmother did needlepoint and knitting and crocheting. My cousins on my dad's side either do or did these things, too. I assume that my cousin's mom (and grandmother's daughter) also did these at some point.

I have some of the embroidery my paternal grandfather's mother did.

But when these things are around to play with, and they seem like the normal thing to do, I think the line between nature and nurture is quite blurred. That we all keep doing these things suggests that nature has a hand in it, but whether we would have found these things without nurture is questionable.

(My father is his own kind of artist - has done some beautiful woodwork, and now writes poetry.)
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