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Old 08-23-2009, 10:18 PM   #1
Vertigo1414
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Washing Machine was hungry...
So my friend Chrissie called me earlier because she washed a knit afghan in the washing machine and it ate a hole in it. i've seen it before and it's just garter stitch with worsted weight. she said it's about a 5 inch hole. she was wondering if we could patch it, or would it be easier to just shorten it and if so how? her mom made it for her so it's got some value to her and if we can save it i would like to.
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Old 08-24-2009, 01:15 AM   #2
Jan in CA
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I'm sure it can be saved by either method, but if you patch it it may not look exactly the same since it's doubtful the yarn or color is available anymore.
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Old 08-24-2009, 11:26 AM   #3
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I've patched a crocheted afghan before and I agree with Jan. But you also might be able combine the two methods for less work and stress.

Examine the hole to see how many rows are broken vs. laddering. Begin to Frog a row or two from the bind off edge and swatch to match gauge/tension and measure the yarn needed for the task before cutting. This swatch is then Frogged to use as a patch for the hole.

A crochet hook of similar size to the needle used can be helpful with laddering without much need for patch yarn. A darning needle would be helpful with Russian joins to patch the broken row/strands. Or to use duplicate stitch to weave the patch into the edges of the hole.

You didn't mention the fiber type. So I guess I should mention that I work mostly with acrylic.

So now I think we need a topic thread on machine washings
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Top Load vs. Front Load and the Gentile Cycle. How to avoid injury to your fiber friends.
Also remember Ben's adage: "A stitch in time saves nine!"

(hmm, I don't remember eating "Fruit Loops" this morning.)
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Old 08-24-2009, 02:28 PM   #4
melmac51
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Originally Posted by OffJumpsJack View Post
I've patched a crocheted afghan before and I agree with Jan. But you also might be able combine the two methods for less work and stress.

Examine the hole to see how many rows are broken vs. laddering. Begin to Frog a row or two from the bind off edge and swatch to match gauge/tension and measure the yarn needed for the task before cutting. This swatch is then Frogged to use as a patch for the hole.

A crochet hook of similar size to the needle used can be helpful with laddering without much need for patch yarn. A darning needle would be helpful with Russian joins to patch the broken row/strands. Or to use duplicate stitch to weave the patch into the edges of the hole.

You didn't mention the fiber type. So I guess I should mention that I work mostly with acrylic.

So now I think we need a topic thread on machine washings


Also remember Ben's adage: "A stitch in time saves nine!"

(hmm, I don't remember eating "Fruit Loops" this morning.)
Great idea Jack! (I wouldn't have thought of it.)
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Old 08-25-2009, 01:17 AM   #5
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Besides the issue of matching yarn,
Crochet can be patched very well.
Knitting not so much. I think it's a case of duplicate stitch for each missing row if you want it to be flawless on each side (but you'll still have all the joins). If you don't mind a bad side you could do the patch and bind off thing and seam it together, assuming you can figure out a good bind off for all the broken ends.

Easier to frog beyond the bad and reknit with the froggings and/or matching yarn. That will give a perfect repair other than the old vs new yarn.
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