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Old 04-30-2010, 05:36 PM   #1
Emmely
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Nail polish and acrylic lacquer
Hi!

Excuse my bad english...

Just a short question:

If you've got two thin ribbons of lace work and paint the first one with nail polish and the second one with a universal acrylic lacquer, like this one:
http://www.crcind.com/csp/web/ProdDi...rand=CRC%20RED

And then wash it in machine, 40 degrees Celsius.

What will happen? Will it go away, or will it starch the thin and very sensitive lace knitting?

Which of them would probably starch the best?

I would only want a clever guess now, I'm about to try it myself ofcourse. Just wondering of anyone of you got a clue, so I atleast kan have a hypothesis. :D

Thanks for all reply!

Emmely
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Old 04-30-2010, 09:37 PM   #2
RuthieinMaryland
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Starching lace...
Hi!

Over the years I've done a lot of lace crocheting with bedspread weight and thinner cotton as well. The thing that's worked best for me has always been liquid starch, mixed in the strongest proportions listed on the label, or even stronger if you add less water.

Once the starch has permeated the piece I wring it or pat it to remove excess starch then lay it out and pin it into shape and let it dry naturally.

This has been sufficient to create a wonderful appearance and when the pieces need to be cleaned, the starch will wash right out and the pieces can be given a fresh starching. Liquid starch is available in most supermarkets although you might have to search for it a bit.

I have some guest towels with hand-made cotton lace on the bottoms and for those I generally just spray a bit of spray starch and iron into shape with a hot iron for a nice crisp finished look.

If you want something more permanent there is a lace stiffener that once applied (and you apply it just like liquid starch) makes a more permanent finish that doesn't wash out. I got some of that years ago at Michaels, but I still preferred the starch.

I don't think what you're proposing will work long term but please keep us posted on how it works out if you try it.

Meanwhile, happy knitting!

Ruthie
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Old 05-01-2010, 12:44 PM   #3
Emmely
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Originally Posted by RuthieinMaryland View Post
Hi!

Over the years I've done a lot of lace crocheting with bedspread weight and thinner cotton as well. The thing that's worked best for me has always been liquid starch, mixed in the strongest proportions listed on the label, or even stronger if you add less water.

Once the starch has permeated the piece I wring it or pat it to remove excess starch then lay it out and pin it into shape and let it dry naturally.

This has been sufficient to create a wonderful appearance and when the pieces need to be cleaned, the starch will wash right out and the pieces can be given a fresh starching. Liquid starch is available in most supermarkets although you might have to search for it a bit.

I have some guest towels with hand-made cotton lace on the bottoms and for those I generally just spray a bit of spray starch and iron into shape with a hot iron for a nice crisp finished look.

If you want something more permanent there is a lace stiffener that once applied (and you apply it just like liquid starch) makes a more permanent finish that doesn't wash out. I got some of that years ago at Michaels, but I still preferred the starch.

I don't think what you're proposing will work long term but please keep us posted on how it works out if you try it.

Meanwhile, happy knitting!

Ruthie
Thank's for answering. Unfortunately, I REALLY can't seem to find any waterproof lace stifferener in Sweden, and I've really really been in search of one. =/

I'm not trying to question you, but is there a reason to why you think that nail polish or acrylic lacquer wouldn't work?

Thank you a lot!

Emmely
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Old 05-01-2010, 09:48 PM   #4
RuthieinMaryland
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Lace
Hi, Emmely!

I think you should question anything you feel doubtful or uncertain about. We all learn a lot that way!

As to the acrylic, if I understood your post correctly, I could envision it as sealing the lace but then wouldn't it be very stiff and scratchy? Maybe I just don't grasp what you're going to do with the lace. Your idea might work well and if so, I hope you'll share it with all of us.

Meanwhile, if you can't find the lace stiffener maybe you can find some liquid starch. But again, that'll depend on what you want to use the lace for.

At any rate, best of luck with it. And please, keep asking your questions!

Happy knitting,

Ruthie
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Old 05-01-2010, 10:01 PM   #5
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I think both would stay in the fabric when it is washed. Something to consider is that if the lace is soiled at all from handling, that will probably not wash out. Might be wise to wash and block the work before applying the lacquer. You are right though, the best thing is to give it a try on a small piece of work and see what happens.
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Old 05-02-2010, 11:14 AM   #6
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stuff
I would be afraid it would break like a fingernail would.
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